Readiness Action Plan

  • Last updated: 21 Sep. 2017 09:52

The Readiness Action Plan (RAP) ensures that the Alliance is ready to respond swiftly and firmly to new security challenges from the east and the south. Begun at the 2014 Wales Summit, this is the most significant reinforcement of NATO's collective defence since the end of the Cold War. At Warsaw in 2016, Allied leaders welcomed its implementation and introduced new work on NATO’s deterrence and defence posture.


Highlights

  • Due to the changed security environment on NATO’s borders, the RAP includes ‘assurance measures’ for NATO member countries in Central and Eastern Europe to reassure their populations, reinforce their defence and deter potential aggression.
  • Assurance measures comprise a series of land, sea and air activities in, on and around the eastern part of Alliance territory, which are reinforced by exercises focused on collective defence and crisis management.
  • The RAP also includes ‘adaptation measures’ which are longer-term changes to NATO’s forces and command structure so that the Alliance will be better able to react swiftly and decisively to sudden crises.
  • Adaptation measures include tripling the size of the NATO Response Force (NRF), the establishment of a Very High Readiness Joint Task Force (VJTF) able to deploy at very short notice, and enhanced Standing Naval Forces.
  • To facilitate readiness and the rapid deployment of forces, eight NATO Force Integration Units (NFIUs) - which are small headquarters - were established in Central and Eastern Europe. Headquarters for the Multinational Corps Northeast in Szczecin, Poland and the Multinational Division Southeast in Bucharest, Romania were also established. In addition, a standing joint logistics support group headquarters is being set up.
  • At the 2016 Warsaw Summit, Allies welcomed the implementation of the RAP and agreed to further strengthen the Alliance’s deterrence and defence posture with an enhanced forward presence in the eastern and southeast part of Alliance territory and a framework for NATO’s adaptation in response to growing challenges and threats emanating from the south.

More background information


  • Assurance measures

    The assurance measures are a series of land, sea and air activities in, on and around the territory of NATO Allies in Central and Eastern Europe, designed to reinforce their defence, reassure their populations and deter potential aggression.  These are a direct result of Russia’s aggressive actions to NATO’s east.  All 29 Allies are contributing to these measures on a rotational basis. The measures can be stepped up or reduced as necessary, depending on the security situation. 

    Since May 2014, NATO has increased the number of fighter jets on air-policing patrols over the Baltic States, and deployed fighter jets to Romania and Poland.  In December 2015, a further package of tailored assurance measures was agreed for Turkey.   The Alliance conducts regular AWACS surveillance flights over the territory of its eastern Allies, and maritime patrol aircraft flights along the eastern borders of Allied territory.

    To provide assurance at sea, NATO deploys a number of multinational maritime forces such as a Standing NATO Mine Counter-Measures Group patrolling the Baltic Sea and the Eastern Mediterranean, and an enlarged Standing NATO Maritime Group conducting maritime assurance measures in addition to counter-terrorism patrols.

    NATO has increased the number of exercises it organises. Military exercises provide important opportunities to improve the ability of Allies and partners to work together and are a valuable demonstration of NATO's readiness to respond to potential threats. These exercises take place on land, at sea and in the air with scenarios based on collective defence and crisis management.

    Assurance measures are flexible and scalable in response to the evolving security situation, and are kept under annual review by the North Atlantic Council – NATO’s principal political decision-making body.

  • Adaptation measures

    Adaptation measures are longer-term changes to NATO’s forces and command structure which will make the Alliance better able to react swiftly and decisively to sudden crises.
    These include the following:

    • An enhanced NATO Response Force

    The NATO Response Force (NRF) is a highly ready and technologically advanced multinational force made up of land, air, maritime and Special Operations Forces (SOF) components that the Alliance can deploy quickly, wherever needed.
    At the 2014 Wales Summit, Allies decided to enhance the NRF to strengthen the Alliance’s collective defence and ensure that NATO has the right forces in the right place at the right time.  The NRF now consists of about 40,000 personnel – a major increase from the previous level of 13,000. Its size is dependent on the task it is needed for.
    The Supreme Allied Commander Europe (SACEUR) has overall command of the NRF.  Each year on rotation, NATO’s two Joint Force Commands (based in Brunssum, the Netherlands and Naples, Italy) have operational command of the NRF. In 2017, JFC Naples is commanding the NRF.

    • Very High Readiness Joint Task Force

    The quick-reaction Very High Readiness Joint Task Force (VJTF) or “spearhead force” of around 20,000, of which about 5,000 are ground troops, is able to begin deployment within two to three days wherever it is needed. The VJTF is supported by air, maritime and SOF components.
    The VJTF and NRF forces are based in their home countries, but able to deploy from there to wherever they are needed for exercises or crisis response. Leadership and membership of the VJTF and NRF rotate on an annual basis. The VJTF participated in its first deployment exercise in Poland in June 2015 and is regularly tested during exercises.
    If deployed in 2017, the VJTF (Land) will be led by the United Kingdom. Other Allies – France, Germany, Italy, Poland and Turkey – will serve as lead nation for the following years.

    • NATO Force Integration Units

    NATO Force Integration Units (NFIUs) are small, multinational headquarters that will facilitate the rapid deployment of the VJTF and Allied follow-on forces. They are staffed by about 40 national and NATO specialists. Their task is to improve cooperation and coordination between NATO and national forces, as well as to prepare and support exercises and any deployments needed. 

    First, six NFIUs were established in Bulgaria, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland and Romania and inaugurated in September 2015, constituting a visible and persistent NATO presence in these countries. Subsequently, two more NFIUs were inaugurated in Hungary and Slovakia.

    • High-readiness multinational headquarters

    The Multinational Corps Northeast Headquarters (HQ MNC-NE) located in in Szczecin, Poland provides a high-readiness capability to command forces deployed to the Baltic States and Poland, if so required.  

    Established by Denmark, Germany and Poland, HQ MNC-NE has four main tasks:

    • commanding the VJTF and NRF, or elements thereof, if deployed to the north-eastern region of NATO;
    • exercising operational control over the NFIUs in Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland and Slovakia;µ
    • monitoring the security situation in the region; and
    • acting as a regional hub for cooperation.

    A new deployable multinational divisional headquarters for the southeast was inaugurated in Bucharest, Romania on 1 December 2015. The new high-readiness headquarters will be able to command forces deployed within NATO’s southeast region, supporting the defence of the Alliance. Multinational Division Southeast Headquarters (HQ MND-SE) is designated to have 280 personnel. HQ MND-SE will execute command and control over the NFIUs in Bulgaria and Romania.

    In addition, the RAP calls for a number of logistics enhancements, including the prepositioning of equipment and supplies, to enhance NATO's readiness to respond to any challenge to Allied security. A new standing joint logistics support group headquarters will be established within the NATO Command Structure.

  • Evolution

    In September 2014at the NATO Wales Summit, Allied leaders approved the RAP to ensure the Alliance is ready to respond swiftly and firmly to new security challenges. The plan provides a comprehensive package of measures to respond to the changes in the security environment in and near Europe and to threats emanating from the Middle East and North Africa.

    NATO defence ministers decided on 5 February 2015 that the VJTF would consist of a land component of around 5,000 troops with appropriate air, maritime and SOF units available. France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Spain, Turkey and the United Kingdom agreed to assume lead roles for the VJTF on a rotational basis in the coming years. Ministers also set the goal of having an operationally capable VJTF by the time of the 2016 Warsaw Summit.

    In April 2015, more than 1,500 troops took part in exercise Noble Jump, designed to test whether troops assigned to NATO’s Interim VJTF could be ready to deploy 48 hours after receiving an order-to-move.

    On 9 June 2015, the VJTF deployed for the first time in Poland during exercise Noble Jump, where over 2,100 troops from nine NATO nations participated.

    On 24 June 2015, NATO defence ministers took decisions on air, maritime and SOF components of the enhanced NRF. The NRF will now consist of up to 40,000 personnel. Ministers further took measures to speed up political and military decision-making, including authority for NATO’s Supreme Allied Commander Europe to prepare troops for action as soon as a political decision is made. Allies also approved a new advance planning tool – Graduated Response Plans – which will enable executable operations plans to be generated exceptionally quickly, commensurate with the readiness requirements of the forces. Allies also agreed on the establishment of a new standing joint logistics support group headquarters within the NATO Command Structure. Finally, defence ministers agreed that in October they would decide on the establishment of new NFIU HQs, in addition to the six existing multinational NFIU HQs.

    In September 2015, NFIUs were inaugurated in Bulgaria, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland and Romania.

    In October 2015, NATO defence ministers gave their green light to the completed military concept for the enhanced NRF, including its command and control arrangements. They also agreed to set up two more NFIUs in Hungary and Slovakia. 

    In December 2015, NATO inaugurated the Multinational Division Southeast Headquarters in Bucharest, marking its official integration into the NATO Command Structure. The new, high-readiness headquarters will be able to command forces deployed within NATO’s southeast region, supporting the Alliance’s defence. It will also be a hub for regional cooperation among Allies. The headquarters is designated to have 280 personnel.

    In July 2016, at the Warsaw Summit, Allies welcomed the implementation of the Readiness Action Plan (RAP) and agreed to further strengthen the Alliance’s deterrence and defence posture.  The RAP will provide the Alliance with a broad range of options to be able to respond to any threats from wherever they arise to protect Alliance territory, population, airspace and sea lines of communication. On 1 July 2016, Multinational Division Southeast Headquarters declared initial capability.

    The last two NFIUs in Hungary and Slovakia were inaugurated respectively on 18 November 2016 and 24 January 2017.