Diese Seite ist nur auf Englisch verfügbar.

Afghanistan nach 2014: der russische Blickwinkel

Russia's interest in what happens in Afghanistan and Central Asia is well known. What isn't is how they see their involvement in the region after 2014, after the ISAF operation in Afghanistan ends. NATO Review asks what the Russian approach will be and what issues are of most interest to them.

Full video transcript

Afghanistan post-2014:

what’s Russia’s view?

As the NATO-led ISAF combat

operation in Afghanistan

winds down at the end of 2014,

Russia is more than a disinterested

observer of what happens next.

Its outlook may still be coloured by

its own nine-year war in the country,

which left

nearly 15,000 soldiers dead.

Strange as it may seem,

some Russian politicians

feel an element of Schadenfreude

at the failure by NATO and the USA.

And they're trying to justify their own

mistakes of almost thirty years ago.

Don’t forget

that the generation now in power

are people who served in Afghanistan

and passed through Afghanistan.

Although its security is linked

to what happens in Afghanistan

and the Central Asian region,

Russia has sometimes

been unclear whether it feels

its security is improved or impaired

by NATO’s presence in Afghanistan.

Russians used to actually

be almost at the same time

against US-NATO

presence in Afghanistan,

but on the other hand

they were highly critical about the,

as they called it, hastily withdrawal

of NATO troops from Afghanistan.

But Russia knows that a lot

of security issues in the region

still need to be addressed.

They understand that

if the Afghan crisis is not resolved,

if the terrorist underground,

the Islamist underground

in the border area is not eliminated,

it will be impossible

to guarantee its security

and its interests in Central Asia.

What Russia doesn’t seem to want,

is major security changes

in the area that it can’t influence.

But these

have already been happening

and not just

through NATO’s activities.

The Russians are afraid

that the Western

withdrawal from Afghanistan

would mean mostly

a shifting of the military presence

of the US and NATO

towards Central Asia.

And that is kind

of a nightmare scenario for them

because they feel vulnerable

and they feel

that they are threatened politically

and on security terms

by both the Western presence

and by the Chinese economic

strong engagement in Central Asia.

So what are Russia’s concerns

about post-2014

Afghanistan and Central Asia?

Who better to ask

than Russia’s ambassador to NATO,

Alexander Grushko?

We are very concerned

about the future of Afghanistan,

both in terms of terrorist threats,

threats of extremism, drug trafficking,

and, you know, that situation

is becoming real catastrophic.

Both the production...

heroin production is increasing.

And the international community

should be more robust

in dealing with this threat

because this is our common interest.

Europe is suffering from that.

Russia suffers very much.

Central Asian countries

suffer very much.

Some analysts say

that a new situation in Central Asia

may require new thinking.

And this may mean

NATO revisiting

relations with the CSTO

or Collective Security

Treaty Organisation,

whose members

include not just Russia,

but also several

Central Asian republics.

I personally think that NATO should

be prepared to revisit its attitude

about the Collective

Security Treaty Organisation.

I’m not sure it’s harmful to NATO

to have some kind of a relationship

with the CSTO

because it’s not just Russia.

There are a number

of other players involved here,

who have... who are going

to be affected very directly,

much more directly and significantly

than any NATO member state

after NATO’s

withdrawal from Afghanistan.

A bigger role for the CSTO is

what Russia’s been pushing for too.

It believes that NATO and the CSTO

working together in Central Asia,

would be a win-win scenario.

Russia is trying to convince our

partners in the NATO-Russia Council

to look

at the possibilities of cooperation

between the CSTO and NATO.

The CSTO is playing

a very important role

in stabilising

the situation around Afghanistan.

NATO is inside Afghanistan.

And if we have

a channel of communications,

if we have certain

partners of cooperation,

it could lead to multiplying

the efficiency of our joint efforts,

be it drug trafficking, be it terrorism,

be it security assessment...

Afghanistan post-2014:

what’s Russia’s view?

As the NATO-led ISAF combat

operation in Afghanistan

winds down at the end of 2014,

Russia is more than a disinterested

observer of what happens next.

Its outlook may still be coloured by

its own nine-year war in the country,

which left

nearly 15,000 soldiers dead.

Strange as it may seem,

some Russian politicians

feel an element of Schadenfreude

at the failure by NATO and the USA.

And they're trying to justify their own

mistakes of almost thirty years ago.

Don’t forget

that the generation now in power

are people who served in Afghanistan

and passed through Afghanistan.

Although its security is linked

to what happens in Afghanistan

and the Central Asian region,

Russia has sometimes

been unclear whether it feels

its security is improved or impaired

by NATO’s presence in Afghanistan.

Russians used to actually

be almost at the same time

against US-NATO

presence in Afghanistan,

but on the other hand

they were highly critical about the,

as they called it, hastily withdrawal

of NATO troops from Afghanistan.

But Russia knows that a lot

of security issues in the region

still need to be addressed.

They understand that

if the Afghan crisis is not resolved,

if the terrorist underground,

the Islamist underground

in the border area is not eliminated,

it will be impossible

to guarantee its security

and its interests in Central Asia.

What Russia doesn’t seem to want,

is major security changes

in the area that it can’t influence.

But these

have already been happening

and not just

through NATO’s activities.

The Russians are afraid

that the Western

withdrawal from Afghanistan

would mean mostly

a shifting of the military presence

of the US and NATO

towards Central Asia.

And that is kind

of a nightmare scenario for them

because they feel vulnerable

and they feel

that they are threatened politically

and on security terms

by both the Western presence

and by the Chinese economic

strong engagement in Central Asia.

So what are Russia’s concerns

about post-2014

Afghanistan and Central Asia?

Who better to ask

than Russia’s ambassador to NATO,

Alexander Grushko?

We are very concerned

about the future of Afghanistan,

both in terms of terrorist threats,

threats of extremism, drug trafficking,

and, you know, that situation

is becoming real catastrophic.

Both the production...

heroin production is increasing.

And the international community

should be more robust

in dealing with this threat

because this is our common interest.

Europe is suffering from that.

Russia suffers very much.

Central Asian countries

suffer very much.

Some analysts say

that a new situation in Central Asia

may require new thinking.

And this may mean

NATO revisiting

relations with the CSTO

or Collective Security

Treaty Organisation,

whose members

include not just Russia,

but also several

Central Asian republics.

I personally think that NATO should

be prepared to revisit its attitude

about the Collective

Security Treaty Organisation.

I’m not sure it’s harmful to NATO

to have some kind of a relationship

with the CSTO

because it’s not just Russia.

There are a number

of other players involved here,

who have... who are going

to be affected very directly,

much more directly and significantly

than any NATO member state

after NATO’s

withdrawal from Afghanistan.

A bigger role for the CSTO is

what Russia’s been pushing for too.

It believes that NATO and the CSTO

working together in Central Asia,

would be a win-win scenario.

Russia is trying to convince our

partners in the NATO-Russia Council

to look

at the possibilities of cooperation

between the CSTO and NATO.

The CSTO is playing

a very important role

in stabilising

the situation around Afghanistan.

NATO is inside Afghanistan.

And if we have

a channel of communications,

if we have certain

partners of cooperation,

it could lead to multiplying

the efficiency of our joint efforts,

be it drug trafficking, be it terrorism,

be it security assessment...

Related videos
|
  • Fußball und veränderte Verteidigungsstrategien
  • Die NATO und die Industrie: dieselben Ziele, aber unterschiedliche Sprachen?
  • Was wird die größte Bedrohung in den kommenden 10 Jahren sein?
  • USA und die EU: mehr Schutz als Verteidigung?
  • Moderne Verteidigung: besser smart als sexy?
  • Helikopter - und warum sie so wichtig sind
  • Europa und die USA: wie stark ist die Verbindung?
  • Franco Frattini:
  • NATO-Russland: erneut zurück auf null?
  • Es geht um Stimmzettel, nicht um Stiefel
  • Cyberangriffe, die NATO - und Angry Birds
  • Cyberangriffe: wie können sie uns schaden?
  • Cyberkrieg - gibt es ihn überhaupt?
  • Hacker zu mieten
  • Vier Außenminister erklären, warum Partner wichtig sind
  • Der Klimawandel in der Arktis: ein Thema für die NATO?
  • Ashton und Paloméros: warum die EU und die NATO Partner benötigen
  • Irlands Umgang mit der NATO und Neutralität
  • Frauen in der Sicherheitspolitik: eine noch zu erledigende Arbeit?
  • Frauen und Sicherheit: persönliche Geschichten
  • Frauen an vorderster Front
  • Die libysche Revolution von 2011... in 2 Minuten
  • Naturgewalten und Streitkräfte
  • Brennstoff für die grauen Zellen
  • Krieg um Trinkwasser?
  • Energie und Umwelt: gute, schlechte und beunruhigende Nachrichten
  • Einheimischer Terrorismus: die Sichtweise der EU
  • Wie kann die NATO einheimischen Terrorismus bekämpfen?
  • Mission Impossible?
  • Social Media und die NATO: es ist kompliziert
  • Umsetzung des Konzepts
  • Mister TransAtlantic
  • Von Cronkite bis Korea: Erkenntnisse
  • Momentaufnahme von Afghanistan: Die Sicht der Experten
  • Der NATO-Gipfel 2012: Was bedeutet er für Chicago?
  • Griechenland: was es bedeutet, seit 60 Jahren NATO-Mitglied zu sein
  • Griechenland und die NATO: die Sichtweise der nächsten Generation
  • Türkei: was es bedeutet, seit 60 Jahren NATO-Mitglied zu sein
  • Türkei: Interview mit Verteidigungsminister Yilmaz
  • Mladic, Srebrenica und Gerechtigkeit
  • Mladic, Gerechtigkeit und 2011: die serbische Sichtweise
  • Die Sichtweise der Region
  • Mladic, Gerechtigkeit und 2011: die kroatische Sichtweise
  • Doppelte Sichtweise - eine afghanisch-amerikanische Perspektive
  • Wohin nun, Afghanistan? Interview mit Ahmed Rashid
  • Kleinwaffen: die wahren Massen- vernichtungswaffen?
  • Die NATO und ihre Partner: Beziehungen im Wandel?
  • Die NATO und Schweden: alte Partner, neue Perspektiven?
  • Zu mehreren ist man sicherer? Die NATO und ihre Partner
  • Beständige Partnerschaften: ist die Korruption nun das Haupt- schlachtfeld in Afghanistan?
  • Social Media: können sie der Demokratie auch schaden?
  • Politischer Wandel: was Social Media tun können - und was nicht
  • Der
  • Optimismus - oder Realismus?
  • Kochen für den Planeten
  • Friss oder stirb
  • Die Weltwirtschaft im Jahr 2011: Aufschwung oder Abschwung?
  • Seltene Erden: das neue Erdöl im Jahr 2011?
  • Zueinander finden: Warum ein umfassender Ansatz so wichtig ist
  • Das neue Strategische Konzept der NATO: ein erfolgreicher Balanceakt?
  • Lissabon: die perfekte Geburtsstätte für das neue Strategische Konzept der NATO?
  • Die Tea Party: Allein zu Haus?
  • Obama, Wahlen und Außenpolitik: Liegt die Verantwortung hier?
  • UNSCR 1325: ein glücklicher 10. Geburtstag?
  • Wie wichtig sind Frauen im neuen Strategischen Konzept der NATO?
  • Sicherheit: noch immer eine von Männern dominierte Branche?
  • Frauen kämpfen heute an vorderster Front - ohne Waffen
  • Warum sollten wir uns um den Jemen sorgen?
  • Jemen: 10 Gründe, sich Sorgen zu machen
  • Verteidigung und Angriff - wie die Truppen Fußball sehen
  • Trennt oder eint Fußball?
  • Wie stellen sich die Veränderungen im Kernwaffen- bereich für die NATO dar?
  • Die Gottes- perspektive: Operation Active Endeavour
  • Die IAEA: die weltweit wichtigste Behörde?
  • 2010: Jahr Null für eine Nulllösung?
  • Obamas nuklearer Traum: Yes, he can?
  • Nuklear-Schach: der nächste Zug des Iran?
  • Der Atomwaffen- sperrvertrag: der wichtigste Vertrag der Welt?
  • Die schmutzige Bombe: niedrige Kosten, hohes Risiko
  • Transport und Piraterie: Von oben betrachtet
  • Das sich wandelnde Antlitz der Sicherheit der Schifffahrt
  • Das sich wandelnde Antlitz der Sicherheit der Schifffahrt
  • China und der Westen: Tastatur- konflikte?
  • Timing ist alles?
  • Admiral James G. Stavridis, Supreme Allied Commander, Europa
  • General Klaus Naumann, Ehemaliger Vorsitzender des NATO- Militäraus- schusses
  • Ivo Daalder, Ständiger Vertreter der Vereinigten Staaten bei der NATO
  • Madeleine K. Albright, Vorsitzende, NATO Strategic Concept Expert Group
  • Jeroen Van der Veer, Vizevorsit- zender, NATO Strategic Concept Expert Group
  • Neues Zeitalter, neue Bedrohungen, neue Antworten
  • Was bedeutet dies für das Militär?
  • Das Thema, um das es im Strategischen Konzept gehen muss, ist...
  • NATO HQ – ist die Zeit reif für eine Renovierung?
  • Ein Kampf der Geister
  • Kommunikation mit der breiten Öffentlichkeit – je einfacher, desto besser (Teil 1)
  • Kommunikation mit der breiten Öffentlichkeit – je einfacher, desto besser (Teil 2)
  • Geschichte: Was hat das Strategische Konzept geformt?
  • Piraterie, Häfen und gescheiterte Staaten: Frontlinien des organisierten Verbrechens?
  • Organisiertes Verbrechen und terroristische Gruppierungen: Kameraden oder Chamäleons?
  • Warum die Finanzkrise für die Sicherheit von Bedeutung ist: ein Überblick in drei Minuten
  • Von den Finanzen zur Verteidigung
  • Die Finanzkrise: Fragen an die Experten
  • Gouverneur Amin aus der Provinz Farah: „Die Rezession könnte den Taliban in die Hände spielen“
  • Die afghanische Gouverneurin Sarabi: „Die vorgeschlagene neue Gesetzgebung im Bereich der Frauenrechte wäre ein Schritt zurück“
  • Jamie Shea: Kosovo - damals und heute
  • Interview: Paddy Ashdown
  • Interview: Der dänische Verteidigungs -minister Soren Gade
  • Interview: Der norwegische Außenminister Jonas Gahr Store
  • Unter dem Eis der Welt...
  • Video-Interview mit Ahmed Rashid
  • Taliban, Fernsehen, Telefone – und Terror
  • Bosnien: eine neue Modellarmee?
  • Reform der bosnischen Polizei: Auftrag erledigt oder eine unmögliche Aufgabe?
  • Karadzic: von Sarajevo nach Den Haag
  • Partnerschaft oder Mitgliedschaft für Finnland?
  • Video-Interview
  • Video-Debatte: Die neuen Medien - Hilfe oder Hindernis in Konflikt- situationen?