NATO REVIEW 2010
Edition 6: View from America: new elections, new directions?
Edition 7: NATO Lisbon Summit Edition
Current Edition:
Predictions for security in 2011
In the next issue NATO Review in 2011
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Predictions for security in 2011
Few can accurately predict the nuances of international security. Anyone predicting 12 months ago the advent of printer cartridge bombs on planes, North Korea bombing South Korean territory or improvised bombs being planted in Times Square or Stockholm may have found an incredulous audience. But these all happened. In this edition, we ask some experts where they see next year's developments.
Take three questions about what will be major security issues next year. Ask four experts and commentators of different ages and nationalities. Collate the answers. And see the results here.
Ever heard of rare earths? Maybe not, but we all use them every day. With 97% of the world's supply in the hands of one nation, should we be worried?
The impact of the global recession has been felt everywhere, including in defence and security. But will 2011 bring an upturn? We ask an expert from the International Monetary Fund.
What have we learned in security in 2010? We present a short picture story with some of the main events from the year - some of which may provide lessons for 2011.

Niels Bohr, the Danish physicist, is often attributed the infamous quote 'prediction is very difficult, especially about the future'. But that is what we are asking our contributors to do in this edition.

Some of their predictions err on the safe side - who could argue that Iran, North Korea and nuclear proliferation will be important in 2011? But some others give a left of field look at what could come next year

Niels Bohr, the Danish physicist, is often attributed the infamous quote 'prediction is very difficult, especially about the future'. But that is what we are asking our contributors to do in this edition.

Some of their predictions err on the safe side - who could argue that Iran, North Korea and nuclear proliferation will be important in 2011? But some others give a left of field look at what could come next year (see for example the comments on Sudan and Pakistan).

We also get an insight from experts in a well known problem - the state of the economy - and a much less well known that could become major soon - rare earths. If you've never heard of them, I recommend spending a few minutes listening to Ian London explaining exactly why they could become a security issue - but also why there are solutions on the way.

Finally, we give an outline of what has passed already over the past 12 months. There have been hopes raised (on nuclear issues), hopes dashed (particularly on the Korean peninsula) and new hopes and aims established (not least in NATO's new Strategic Concept).

NATO Review wishes all of its viewers, readers and contributors a very happy and safe holiday period and a fruitful new year, when we'll be back with a new look and approach to presenting the security issues that spark debate today about what could await us tomorrow.

Paul King