NATO REVIEW 2004
Edition 1: Taking NATO's partnerships forward
Edition 2: On the eve of Istanbul
Current Edition:
Interpreting Istanbul
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Due to translations, the other language editions of NATO Review go online approximately two weeks after the English version.
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Interpreting Istanbul
The Istanbul Summit that took place on 28 and 29 June 2004 was a milestone for NATO as leaders of all 26 Allies gathered for the first time following the Alliance's fifth and largest round of enlargement. This issue of NATO Review, which is entitled Interpreting Istanbul, analyses the detail behind many of the initiatives unveiled at the Summit.
Gülnur Aybet places the Istanbul Summit in its historical context, examines its contents and assesses its significance.
Daniel Speckhard explains how NATO has set about training Iraqi security forces.
Lionel Ponsard examines the significance for the European Union and NATO relations of the termination of SFOR and deployment of EUFOR.
Nicola de Santis describes how NATO is forging cooperative relations with the Mediterranean and broader Middle East.
General Jean-Louis Py has been Commander of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) since the deployment of the Eurocorps in Afghanistan in August 2004.
Stefan Melnik reviews an Alliance primer.
C. Richard Nelson analyses NATO's contribution to the fight against terrorism and suggests how it might be enhanced.
Ryan C. Hendrickson assesses the legacy of Manfred Wörner, NATO's seventh Secretary General, ten years after his death.
Marshall Billingslea examines how NATO is developing technology to counter increasingly sophisticated terrorism.

The Istanbul Summit that took place on 28 and 29 June 2004 was a milestone for NATO as leaders of all 26 Allies gathered for the first time following the Alliance's fifth and largest round of enlargement. This issue of NATO Review, which is entitled Interpreting Istanbul, analyses the detail behind many of the initiatives unveiled at the Summit. In the first of four articles devoted to this theme, Gülnur Aybet of Kent University in Canterbury, England, places the Summit in its historical context and assesses its significance. Daniel Speckhard of the Policy Planning Unit in the NATO Secretary General's Private Office explains how the Alliance has set about training Iraqi security forces. Lionel Ponsard of the NATO Defense College in Rome examines the significance for the European Union and NATO of the termination of SFOR and deployment of EUFOR. And Nicola de Santis of NATO's Public Diplomacy Division examines how the Alliance is forging cooperative relations with the Mediterranean and broader Middle East.

Stefan Melnik, a freelance writer on international affairs, reviews a soon-to-be-published text book on NATO that should help students struggling to come to grips with the Alliance. In the interview, General Jean-Louis Py, commander of the International Security Assistance Force, discusses Afghanistan's ongoing security needs in the wake of historic presidential elections. C. Richard Nelson of the Atlantic Council of the United States analyses NATO's contribution to the fight against terrorism and suggests how it might be enhanced. In a new history file, Ryan C. Hendrickson of Eastern Illinois University assesses the legacy of Manfred Wörner ten years after his death. And Marshall Billingslea of NATO's Defence Investment Division examines how NATO is developing technology to counter increasingly sophisticated terrorism. Interactive maps illustrating NATO enlargement, partnerships and strategic relationships round out the edition.

Christopher Bennett