NATO REVIEW 2003
Current Edition:
Interpreting Prague
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Interpreting Prague
The Prague Summit that took place on 21 and 22 November was a defining moment for NATO and for Europe.
Lord Robertson examines the significance of the Prague Summit and considers the challenges ahead.
Christopher Bennett analyses how the Alliance has refined its contribution to the war on terrorism and compares the current debate on NATO reform with that of a decade earlier.
Osman Yavuzalp describes how NATO members and Partner countries will be working together to combat terrorism.
Alberto Bin examines how the Alliance's Mediterranean Dialogue has been upgraded at the Prague Summit and considers its future evolution.
Steve Larrabee and François Heisbourg discuss the role NATO should pursue
Christopher Bennett reviews literature examining military reform in the seven countries invited to join NATO at the Prague Summit.
General James L. Jones is the first Marine to be appointed Supreme Allied Commander, Europe and Commander of US Forces, Europe. He succeeded General Joseph W. Ralston on 17 January this year and is the 14th SACEUR.
Adrian Pop examines the challenge facing Romania for the country to become an effective contributor to the Alliance.
Karel Kovanda considers how the Czech experience of NATO accession may be useful for the seven countries invited to join the Alliance at the Prague Summit.
Federico Trillo-Figueroa Martínez-Conde describes how Spain has taken the lead to build a fleet of European air tankers.
NATO member states and invitees since Prague 2002

The Prague Summit that took place on 21 and 22 November was a defining moment for NATO and for Europe. Decisions taken by Alliance leaders in Prague have put a permanent end to the divisions that scarred Europe in the 20th century and set in motion a modernisation process to ensure that NATO is able to deal as effectively with the security challenges of the 21st century as it was with the threats of the last. This issue of NATO Review, which is entitled Interpreting Prague analyses the detail behind many of the initiatives unveiled at the Summit. In the first of four articles devoted to this theme, NATO Secretary General Lord Robertson examines the significance of the Prague Summit and considers the challenges ahead. I analyse how NATO has refined its contribution to the war on terror since 9/11. And two writers from NATO's Political Affairs Division analyse specific initiatives that they themselves work on. Osman Yavuzalp describes how NATO members and Partner countries will be working together to combat terrorism. And Alberto Bin examines how the Alliance's Mediterranean Dialogue has been upgraded. Future issues of NATO Review will examine other key initiatives, including the NATO Response Force and the reform of NATO's Command Structure.

In the debate, Steve Larrabee of RAND Corporation in Washington DC and François Heisbourg of Fondation pour la Recherche Stratégique in Paris discuss how global a role NATO can and should pursue. I review literature on military reform in the countries invited to join NATO in Prague. In the interview, General James L. Jones, the new SACEUR, lays out his vision for the coming years. Karel Kovanda, Czech permanent representative to NATO, considers how the Czech experience of NATO accession may be useful for the invitees. Adrian Pop of the Dimitrie Cantemir University in Bucharest analyses the challenge facing Romania, the largest of the seven invitees. And Spanish Defence Minister Federico Trillo-Figueroa Martínez-Conde describes how his country has taken the lead to build a fleet of European air tankers. Interactive maps illustrating NATO enlargement round out the edition.

Christopher Bennett