NATO REVIEW 2001
Current Edition:
The transatlantic link today
In the next issue In the next issue
 Videos
 RSS
 Subscribe
All archives - Schedule
LANGUAGE
Due to translations, the other language editions of NATO Review go online approximately two weeks after the English version.
© - About
  
 Subscribe
The transatlantic link today
Judging by readers' letters, the new-look NATO Review seems to have struck a chord. This issue contains several more innovations, including an interview feature and a statistics page.
Focus on NATO: news about NATO, January 2001
Simon Serfaty places the transatlantic relationship in its historical context and considers issues likely to shape it in the coming years.
James Dobbins, US assistant secretary for European affairs, tells Review editor Christopher Bennett that he sees continuity in transatlantic relations.
Christoph Bertram assesses European concerns and expectations at the change of tenant in the White House.
Yes: Franois Heisbourg is director of Geneva's Centre for Security Policy. No: Rob de Wijk is professor of international relations at Leiden University, the Royal Military Academy and the Clingendael Institute.
New faces have appeared in NATO's Brussels headquarters in recent years as Partner nationals have seized opportunities to witness Alliance decision-making and operations for themselves.
Duge is a remote village in Kosovo's Crnoljeva mountains lying near the cross-roads between the towns of Urosevac and Prizren. It has a population of about 200, is largely cut off from the rest of the province in winter and, in common with much of Kosovo, suffered large-scale destruction during fighting in 1998 and 1999. Today, life is beginning to return to normal, in large part because of the efforts of a KFOR civil-military cooperation (CIMIC) team.
As Hungary's ambassador to NATO from 1995 and his country's first permanent representative to the Alliance from 1999, Andras Simonyi played a key role first in steering Hungary to NATO membership and then in overseeing the transition.
Andrei Zagorski examines the thaw in NATO-Russia relations and the reasons for both optimism and caution.
Michael Rhle reviews some of the best and the worst recent literature on the Alliance.
Elinor Sloan examines NATO force mobility and deployability, as well as the impact of programmes aimed at improving capabilities.
NATO releases defence expenditure figures once a year. The complete figures, which have hitherto been reproduced in NATO Review, now instead appear on the NATO web site.

Judging by readers' letters, the new-look NATO Review seems to have struck a chord. This issue contains several more innovations, including an interview feature and a statistics page. Otherwise, the central theme is the transatlantic security relationship, the basis of the Atlantic Alliance, in the wake of the change of administration in the United States. Simon Serfaty, director of Washington DC's Center for Strategic and International Studies, places the transatlantic relationship in its historical context. Ambassador James Dobbins, assistant secretary of state for European affairs, tells in an interview how, despite the changeover, he expects continuity in this key relationship. And Christoph Bertram, director of the Berlin-based Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik, assesses European concerns and expectations. In the debate, Franois Heisbourg, director of Geneva's Centre for Security Policy, and Rob de Wijk, professor of international relations at the Netherlands' Royal Military Academy, explore the changing nature of the transatlantic security relationship. Features include articles on NATO's Partnership for Peace Internship Programme and civil-military cooperation in Kosovo. In the interview, Ambassador Andras Simonyi, Hungary's first permanent representative to NATO, talks of the impact of NATO membership on his country. In the book review, Michael Rhle, the head of speech-writing and policy planning in NATO's political affairs division, considers some of the recent literature on NATO. Elsewhere, Andrei Zagorski of the EastWest Institute analyses recent developments in NATO-Russia relations. And Elinor Sloan of the Directorate of Strategic Analysis at Canada's National Defence Headquarters examines NATO force mobility and deployability. Statistics illustrating NATO's defence expenditure round out the issue.

Christopher Bennett