NATO REVIEW 2001
Edition 1: The transatlantic link today
Current Edition:
The Peacekeeping Challenge
In the next issue In the next issue
 Videos
 RSS
 Subscribe
All archives - Schedule
LANGUAGE
Due to translations, the other language editions of NATO Review go online approximately two weeks after the English version.
© - About
  
 Subscribe
The Peacekeeping Challenge
This time, the central theme is peacekeeping, an area in which the Alliance has become increasingly involved in recent years.
Focus on NATO: news about NATO, June 2001
Espen Barth Eide examines the way in which peacekeeping has evolved since the end of the Cold War and the nature of the challenge today.
Christopher Bellamy argues that the best peacekeepers are also the best war-fighters and peacekeeping is anything but an activity for wimps
David Lightburn reviews NATO's peacekeeping experience and compares how the Alliance and the United Nations are applying lessons from the Balkans.
Bill Nash is a retired US major general and director of the Council on Foreign Relations' Center for Preventive Action, who was formerly UN regional administrator in northern Kosovo and commander of the first US division to deploy in the Balkans. John Hillen is the chief operating officer of Island ECN Inc and a former US Army officer who has published widely on international security and was a consultant to the Bush campaign during the last US presidential election.
Jamie Shea reflects on continued interest in NATO's Kosovo campaign and reviews five books which have already appeared on the subject.
Since November 1998, General Sir Rupert Smith has been Deputy Supreme Allied Commander Europe.
Carlo Scognamiglio-Pasini explains how and why Italy has expanded its role in the NATO-led Balkan peacekeeping operations.
Bronislaw Komorowski explains the reasoning behind his country's new programme to restructure and modernise its armed forces.
Vicki Nielsen examines how far women have been integrated in NATO forces.

The latest issue of the new-look NATO Review has again generated a large mailbag, including requests for a letters' page. In response, this feature will be added in a future edition.

This time, the central theme is peacekeeping, an area in which the Alliance has become increasingly involved in recent years. Espen Barth Eide, state secretary in the Royal Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, examines the evolution of peacekeeping since the Cold War.

Christopher Bellamy, professor of military science and doctrine at Cranfield University, argues that peacekeeping is anything but an activity for wimps. And David Lightburn of the Pearson Peacekeeping Center compares how NATO and the United Nations are applying lessons learned in the Balkans.

In the debate, Bill Nash, director of the Council on Foreign Relations' Center for Preventive Action, and John Hillen, a security consultant to US President George W. Bush's election campaign, discuss whether soldiers can be both peacekeepers and warriors.

This subject is revisited in the interview, in which, among other subjects, General Sir Rupert Smith, Deputy Supreme Allied Commander Europe, gives his views on the appropriate tasks for soldiers in peacekeeping operations.

In the book review, Jamie Shea, director of NATO's Office of Information and Press, reviews five books which have already appeared on the Alliance's Kosovo campaign.

Elsewhere, Bronislaw Komorowski, Poland's defence minister, explains his country's military reform programme. And Carlo Scognamiglio-Pasini, a former Italian defence minister, explains Italy's expanded role in Balkan peacekeeping operations.

Finally, 25 years after the Committee on Women in the NATO Forces was formally recognised, Vicki Nielsen, NATO Review assistant editor, examines the extent to which women have been integrated in NATO armies. Statistics illustrating the numbers of women in NATO forces and peacekeeping operations round out the issue.

Christopher Bennett