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Updated: 25-Jun-2002 NATO Review


Summer 2001

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Focus on NATO

Alliance news in brief

The Peacekeeping Challenge

Peacekeeping past and present
Espen Barth Eide examines the evolution of peacekeeping since the Cold War.

Combining combat readiness and compassion
Christopher Bellamy argues that peacekeeping is anything but an activity for wimps.

Lessons learned
David Lightburn compares how NATO and the United Nations are applying lessons learned in the Balkans.

Debate

Can soldiers be peacekeepers and warriors?
Bill Nash VS John Hillen
Should combat troops be committed to peacekeeping operations? Will this dull their war-fighting skills?

Review
Instant history
Jamie Shea reviews five books which have already appeared on NATO's Kosovo campaign.
Interview
Special

Increasing Italy's input
Carlo Scognamiglio-Pasini explains Italy's expanded role in Balkan peacekeeping operations.

Reforming Poland's military
Bronislaw Komorowski explains Poland's military reform programme.

MIlitary matters
Women in uniform
Vicki Nielsen examines the integration of women in NATO armed forces.
Statistics

Women in NATO Forces and peacekeeping operations
(PDF/78Kb)

On the cover:

NATO peace-keeper welcomes returning Kosovo Albanian refugee home.
Nick Sidle - Allied Mouse and Heartstone

The latest issue of the new-look NATO Review has again generated a large mailbag, including requests for a letters' page. In response, this feature will be added in a future edition.

This time, the central theme is peacekeeping, an area in which the Alliance has become increasingly involved in recent years. Espen Barth Eide, state secretary in the Royal Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, examines the evolution of peacekeeping since the Cold War.

Christopher Bellamy, professor of military science and doctrine at Cranfield University, argues that peacekeeping is anything but an activity for wimps. And David Lightburn of the Pearson Peacekeeping Center compares how NATO and the United Nations are applying lessons learned in the Balkans.

In the debate, Bill Nash, director of the Council on Foreign Relations' Center for Preventive Action, and John Hillen, a security consultant to US President George W. Bush's election campaign, discuss whether soldiers can be both peacekeepers and warriors.

This subject is revisited in the interview, in which, among other subjects, General Sir Rupert Smith, Deputy Supreme Allied Commander Europe, gives his views on the appropriate tasks for soldiers in peacekeeping operations.

In the book review, Jamie Shea, director of NATO's Office of Information and Press, reviews five books which have already appeared on the Alliance's Kosovo campaign.

Elsewhere, Bronislaw Komorowski, Poland's defence minister, explains his country's military reform programme. And Carlo Scognamiglio-Pasini, a former Italian defence minister, explains Italy's expanded role in Balkan peacekeeping operations.

Finally, 25 years after the Committee on Women in the NATO Forces was formally recognised, Vicki Nielsen, NATO Review assistant editor, examines the extent to which women have been integrated in NATO armies. Statistics illustrating the numbers of women in NATO forces and peacekeeping operations round out the issue.

Christopher Bennett

 

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