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Updated: 14-May-2002 NATO Review



Table of Contents


1

TOWARDS A NATO SUMMIT
Warren Christopher, US Secretary of State

Last April, President Clinton described NATO in this journal as "an alliance built and sustained not solely on the power of arms, but by the power of ideas" (1). The ideas that NATO cherishes - peace, freedom, democracy, and security - are gaining strength throughout Europe and beyond, but they also face new challenges. This changing environment requires a vital and adaptable NATO that will continue to defend and promote our common values and interests. In order to assess how to strengthen the Alliance and hasten NATO's transformation to the post-Cold War world, President Clinton has proposed a NATO Summit at the end of this year or early next.


 

No 4

1993



2

GEORGIA'S SECURITY OUTLOOK
Eduard Shevardnadze, Chairman of the Parliament and Head of State of Georgia

When I visited NATO headquarters in Brussels and addressed the North Atlantic Council on 23 June of this year, I recalled the winter's day in 1989 when, as Soviet Foreign Minister, I crossed the threshold of NATO headquarters for the first time. The excitement that I felt then arose partly from this unprecedented event and the emotional background to the meeting, but above all, from the content of our discussions that day.


3

UKRAINIAN SECURITY AND THE NUCLEAR DILEMMA
Anatoly Zlenko, Foreign Minister of Ukraine

After the dissolution of the USSR at the end of 1991, Ukraine was left with the world's third-largest strategic nuclear force, and a substantial number of tactical nuclear weapons on its territory. Ever since, the fate of this arsenal has been a matter of considerable concern, both for Ukraine and for the rest of the world.


4

NATO'S FUTURE AS A PAN-EUROPEAN SECURITY INSTITUTION
Douglas Stuart, (Robert Blaine Weaver Professor of Political Science and Director of International Studies,
Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, USA)

Nearly four years have passed since the collapse of the Berlin Wall. It is ironic that one of the most commonly heard predictions at that time was that NATO would soon follow the Wall into the history books. Pundits joked that the acronym 'NATO' stood for "No Alternative To Obsolescence". With the benefit of hindsight, we can now see that predictions of NATO's imminent demise were anchored in two flawed assumptions which were based upon an incorrect assessment of the post-Cold War situation and a misunderstanding of the Alliance itself.


5

NATO'S ECONOMIC COOPERATION
WITH NACC PARTNERS

Daniel George, Director of NATO's Economics Directorate

Following the inauguration of the North Atlantic Cooperation Council (NACC) in December 1991, NATO's economic functions have been restructured to cover joint activities with the Cooperation Partner countries. A major effort of the Economics Committee, with support from the Economics Directorate, is now directed towards assisting Partners in those security-related economic areas where NATO enjoys special competence.


6

SHARED CIVIL/MILITARY USAGE
OF NATO INFRASTRUCTURE

Herpert Van Foreest
NATO Assistant Secretary General for Infrastructure,
Logistics and Civil Emergency Planning

NATO's new strategy for the post-Cold War era has enabled the overall size of the Allies' forces, and in many cases their readiness, to be significantly reduced. It has also enabled a major reduction in forces stationed overseas, especially in Germany. As a result, the Alliance now has a smaller and rather different requirement for military infrastructure in Allied Command Europe (ACE), and host nations are facing problems arising from reduced employment, interim maintenance responsibility for empty facilities and local pockets of reduced economic activity.


   

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