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Updated: 16-Apr-2002 NATO Review



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1

The White House Washington

The world we live in has changed dramatically.Dreams once thought impossible have become reality: the end of the Cold War, the end of the division of Europe, the unification of Germany, and the revolutionary changes in the former Soviet Union.We welcome change, even as we recognize that it can introduce uncertainty and danger.


 

No 2

1993



2

PREPARING THE GROUND FOR
AN ALLIANCE PEACEKEEPING ROLE

Salvo Andò, Minister of Defence of Italy

The end of the Cold War has brought to a close the confrontation between the two blocs and, as regards the West, eliminated the massive threat represented by the Soviet Union and the Warsaw Pact.


3

MORE OPTIMISM FOR THE BALKANS
Boyko Noev, Head of the Department of European Cooperation and Institutions,
Bulgarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs

The crisis in the former Yugoslavia, which has developed into the most serious current security problem in Europe, has brought to light an old syndrome in thinking, according to which the term 'Balkans' carries extremely negative connotations when speaking of international security and stability and of behaviour in interstate and intercommunal relations. There is an impression that the whole region is inevitably doomed to long-term instability and conflict. This, however, belittles the significant efforts and indeed sacrifices being made by the majority of states in the Balkans to find a solution to the crisis. These same states, by the way, could not share the historical responsibilities of the great powers which five, seven and more decades ago, planted the detonators in what they themselves later called "the powder keg of Europe".


4

PUTTING GERMANY'S POST-UNIFICATION FOREIGN POLICY TO THE TEST
Bregor Schöllgen,
Professor of Modern and Contemporary History at the University of Erlangen, Germany

As 1990 ended and 1991 began, Germany's foreign policy was in a difficult position. A year earlier, on 9 November 1989, the Wall - the very symbol of German division - had come down. Then, following the signing on 12 September 1990 of the so-called Two-Plus-Four Treaty by the allies - victors of the Second World War - and the two German states, German unification was celebrated in Berlin only a few weeks later on 3 October 1990.


5

NATO ARMAMENTS COOPERATION
IN THE 1990S

Robin Beard,
NATO Assistant Secretary General
for Defence Support

It would be difficult to overstate the differences in the environment for NATO armaments cooperation between my first tour as NATO Assistant Secretary General (1984-1987) and today. The dramatic changes which have taken place in the European security environment since 1989 have changed completely the circumstances in which nations plan for equipment procurement and armaments cooperation.


6

TAIPEI-BEIJING RELATIONS AND
EAST ASIAN STABILITY:
IMPLICATIONS FOR EUROPE

Dr. Ying-jeou Ma,
Minister of Justice of the Republic of China (Taiwan)

The world has changed more rapidly in the past two years than at any time since 1945. Although a new world order has begun to emerge, it is still messy, evolving, and not susceptible to simple formulation or manipulation. But one thing seems certain: the world is getting more and more interdependent. States are being linked together in various ways and affected by events beyond their borders, whether they like it or not. Meanwhile, the world is in a state of flux; unless we grasp the larger picture, we will be ill-prepared for the problems ahead and our options will be limited to reactive, damage-control measures in the event of a crisis.


   

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