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Updated: 16-Apr-2002 NATO Review



Table of Contents


1

A VIGOROUS ALLIANCE
A MOTOR FOR PEACEFUL CHANGE
IN EUROPE

Manfred Wörner,
NATO Secretary General and
Chairman of the North Atlantic Council

Since the collapse of the Berlin Wall, changes of biblical proportion have come to Europe at space age speed. This is what a recent commentator wrote and I cannot but agree. Yet no one who is familiar with the Alliance - its large number of member countries, its complex decision-making structures and its rule of consensus - can fail to be impressed by the speed with which we recognized the scope of those changes and moved to adapt our Alliance to them.


 

No 6

1992



2

THE CHALLENGES TO NATO :
A BRITISH VIEW

Sir John Weston , Permanent Representative of the United Kingdom
on the North Atlantic Council

There has been no shortage of political and intellectual challenges to the North Atlantic Alliance during the late-1980s and the early years of the new decade. Individually and collectively, our 16 governments have had to address the most radical transformation in Europe's strategic geography since the birth of NATO. The Alliance has adapted with speed and vision. When I took up my post as the United Kingdomis Permanent Representative at the beginning of this year, one could already point to a number of important milestones in the Alliance's development: in particular, fundamental changes to our strategy and our force and command structures; and the establishment of the North Atlantic Cooperation Council, putting our relationship with our former adversaries on an entirely new footing.


3

DOES THE WEST UNDERSTAND
CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE?

Ferenc Gazdag Professor of Modern History, University of Eötvös Lorand, Budapest and Deputy Director of the Institute for Strategic and Defence Studies, Budapest

Those joyful days during the period of systemic political change have passed, the internal political events of the countries East of the former Iron Curtain no longer figuring in the headlines of Western newspapers - with the exception of the former Soviet Union and Yugoslavia, in the process of disintegration. The euphoria of 1989 already belongs to the past and the illusions generated by it are similarly collapsing, in both Eastern and Western Europe.


4

THE EUROPEAN SECURITY ORDER:
A GREEK VIEW

Theodore Christodoulides,
Professor of Political Science and
International Relations,
Panteion University, Athens

The geopolitical earthquake of 1989, which entailed the demise of communism and ignited a process of dissolution of many of the multi- ethnic states of Central and Eastern Europe after the unravelling of their ideological fabric, has also eliminated the certainties of the Cold War.History and geography, which tight bipolarism had kept in limbo for over 40 years, have re-emerged on the international scene to liberate millions of people from totalitarian regimes and redraw large sections of Europe's map.


5

THE CHANGING FACE OF AUSTRIAN NEUTRALITY
Otmar Lahodynsky Brussels-based correspondent for 'the Vienna daily, Die Presse

When on state visits abroad, Austria's new Federal President, Thomas Klestil, who took office in July 1992, is invariably asked about his country's neutrality. As he stated in late September in Brussels, 'Austria's neutrality is not an end in itself'. The country wished to be part of a collective security system in Europe because 'Europe's security is also our security'.


   

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