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Updated: 10-Apr-2002 NATO Review



Table of Contents


1

THE FUTURE OF EUROPEAN SECURITY. PRAGUE CONFERENCE CONFIRMS AGREEMENT ON BASIC IDEAS
Jiri Dienstbier, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Czech and Slovak Federal Republic

Whenever the perspectives of European security are on the agenda, I recall the 23rd of December 1989 when, together with my colleague Mr. Genscher, I cut the frontier barriers between my country and the Federal Republic of Germany, near the towns of Rozvadov and Waidhaus. This act served as a symbol not only of the removal of the Iron Curtain and the beginning of new relations between our countries, but also of the need to re-evaluate the previous approaches to strengthening stability on our continent.


 

No 3

1991



2

EUROPEAN SECURITY:
LESSONS LEARNED FROM THE GULF WAR

William H. Taft, IV US Permanent Representative on the North Atlantic Council

As the Alliance begins its 43rd year, there can be no more important task for all our nations than to maintain the common foundation we have built with such care. But we must also adapt our partnership to the dramatic changes which have presented us with new tasks. Adapting to the changes in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union to make our former adversaries into partners is one part of the job. Developing a larger role for the European countries to play within the Atlantic Alliance as the European Community moves towards a political union and a common foreign and security policy is another.


3

THE NEW EUROPEAN SECURITY ARCHITECTURE - A SWEDISH PERSPECTIVE
Kaj Sundberg, Former Ambassador of Sweden to Belgium

"We are living in a period of exceptional historic optimism."


4

THE POLITICAL UPHEAVAL IN EUROPE
AND THE REFORM OF NATO STRATEGY

Eckhard Lübkemeier of the Friedrich Ebert Foundation

From the point of view of security policy, Europe is undergoing a period of upheaval. The East-West confrontation is over but there is still a long way to go before a stable order of peace is attained. In this situation, security policy must be guided by clear objectives based on public consensus. This applies to NATO policy in general and to its military strategy in particular.


5

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY IN SUPPORT OF ECONOMIC GROWTH. NATO'S SCIENCE FOR
STABILITY PROGRAMME

Henry A. Lee, Director, Science for Stability Programme

Can a relatively modest assistance programme have any effect in increasing an entire nation's capacity for technological innovation and the application of scientific research? Indeed it can, if it is carefully designed and managed to target the assistance in ways which produce self-multiplying benefits. NATO's Science for Stability Programme has been demonstrating this point for the past decade in three nations of the North Atlantic Alliance - Greece, Portugal and Turkey. Moreover, Science for Stability (SfS) is providing tangible evidence of the determination of Alliance members to implement Article 2 of the North Atlantic Treaty - "to promote conditions of stability and well-being".


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