NATO REVIEW 2002
Edition 1: Examining Enlargement
Current Edition:
Transforming the Alliance
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Due to translations, the other language editions of NATO Review go online approximately two weeks after the English version.
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Transforming the Alliance
This issue of NATO Review focuses on the debate over the modernisation of NATO in the run-up to the Prague Summit. Entitled Transforming the Alliance, it considers how NATO should evolve to meet the security challenges of the 21st century.
Günther Altenburg examines how NATO has dealt with crises in its history and considers how this impacts the current debate over modernising the Alliance.
Marc Grossman sets out Washington's vision for NATO in advance of the Alliance's Prague Summit.
General Klaus Naumann warns that NATO is in danger of outliving its utility, unless urgent steps are taken to revitalise the Alliance.
Guillaume Parmentier argues that NATO needs to focus on its military capabilities and to become a more equal partnership between the United States and the other Allies.
Daniel S. Hamilton versus Sir Timothy Garden
Jamie Shea reflects on the life and career of Joseph Luns, NATO's fifth secretary general.
With former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic on trial in The Hague, Christopher Bennett reviews two recent books examining the effectiveness of war crimes tribunals.
Anton Tus became the first Croatian ambassador to NATO after Croatia joined the Partnership for Peace in May 2000.
A CD-ROM designed by a German officer and English teachers from Bulgaria and Lithuania to help peacekeepers improve their English is proving so successful that the British Council has bought several hundred copies and distributed them to military academies in more than 20 countries to promote the learning of English.
The events of 11 September 2001 have added a sense of urgency to a NATO Science project seeking to address the challenges posed by the increasing vulnerability of today's interconnected society. Launched six months before the fateful day, it comes under the auspices of the Alliance's Committee on Challenges to Modern Society (CCMS).
Paul Fritch assesses the prospects of the new NATO-Russia Council.
Robert G. Bell examines the challenges confronting the Alliance in armaments cooperation.
Presentation of different statistics on armed forced per countries, military spendings in 2002

This issue of NATO Review focuses on the debate over the modernisation of NATO in the run-up to the Prague Summit. Entitled Transforming the Alliance, it considers how NATO should evolve to meet the security challenges of the 21st century.

This issue of NATO Review focuses on the debate over the modernisation of NATO in the run-up to the Prague Summit. Entitled Transforming the Alliance, it considers how NATO should evolve to meet the security challenges of the 21st century. In the first of four articles devoted to this theme, Günther Altenburg, assistant secretary general in NATO's Political Affairs Division, examines how NATO has dealt with crises in its history and considers how this impacts the current debate. Marc Grossman, US under-secretary of state for political affairs, sets out Washington's vision for the Alliance. And two European analysts, General Klaus Naumann, a former chairman of NATO's Military Committee, and Guillaume Parmentier, head of the Paris-based Centre français sur les Etats-Unis, give their views on how the Alliance should reform itself.

Elsewhere, in the debate, Daniel S. Hamilton, director of the Center for Transatlantic Studies at Johns Hopkins University and Sir Timothy Garden of the Centre for Defence Studies at King's College London discuss whether NATO's new function should be counter-terrorism. In the wake of death of Joseph Luns, the Alliance's longest-serving secretary general, Jamie Shea, director of NATO's Office of Information and Press, reflects on his life and career. I review two recent publications on war crimes tribunals. Croatian Ambassador to NATO Anton Tus explains in an interview why his country has joined the Membership Action Plan. And features cover an innovative approach to teaching English to peacekeepers and a NATO Science project addressing the increasing vulnerability of interconnected society. In the wake of the creation of the new NATO-Russia Council, Paul Fritch of NATO's Political Affairs Division assesses its prospects. And Robert G. Bell, assistant secretary general in NATO's Defence Support Division, examines the challenges confronting the Alliance in armaments cooperation. Statistics on defence spending and military personnel round out the edition.

Christopher Bennett