NATO REVIEW 2001
Edition 2: The Peacekeeping Challenge
Edition 3: NATO's evolving partnerships
Current Edition:
Combating New Security Threats
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Due to translations, the other language editions of NATO Review go online approximately two weeks after the English version.
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Combating New Security Threats
The magnitude of the events of 11 September, when terrorists flew hijacked airliners into the Pentagon and World Trade Center, is such that the date has already been ingrained on humanity's collective consciousness. Few people alive today will ever be able to forget where they were or what they were doing when they heard the news.
Short news on NATO activites, December 2001
Christopher Bennett examines how the Alliance has assisted the United States since 11 September and its contribution to the campaign against terrorism.
Robert Hall and Carl Fox argue that new, comprehensive and transnational strategies are required to deal with the security challenges of the 21st century.
Frank J. Cilluffo and Daniel Rankin urge adoption of a flexible, comprehensive and coordinated strategy to fight terrorism.
Timothy Shimeall, Phil Williams and Casey Dunlevy argue that defence planning has to incorporate the virtual world to limit physical damage in the real.
Willem Matser examines NATO-Russia relations in the wake of 11 September and the prospects for improved cooperation.
Ted Whiteside has headed NATO's Weapons of Mass Destruction Centre since its creation in autumn 2000. He joined NATO's Political Affairs Division in September 1999 as deputy head of the Disarmament, Arms Control and Cooperative Security Section, having served in the Canadian Delegation to NATO and the Canadian Embassy in Bonn.
As NATO's Central Asian Partners take up frontline positions in the international coalition against terrorism, Osman Yavuzalp (1) examines the Alliance's relations with these countries.
Keith B. Payne is president of the National Institute for Public Policy, chairman of the Deterrence Concepts Advisory Group of the Office of the Secretary of Defense and adjunct professor at Georgetown University. Joseph Cirincione is Director of the Non-Proliferation Project at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
Petr Lunak (1) considers how documents discovered in Warsaw Pact archives are influencing and challenging conventional interpretations of the Cold War alliances.
Graphs on countries suffering casualties on 11 September 2001

The magnitude of the events of 11 September, when terrorists flew hijacked airliners into the Pentagon and World Trade Center, is such that the date has already been ingrained on humanity's collective consciousness. Few people alive today will ever be able to forget where they were or what they were doing when they heard the news. In response, this issue of NATO Review focuses on new security threats and ways of combating them. In the first of four articles on this theme, I look at how the Alliance has assisted the United States in the wake of the 11 September attacks. Subsequently, Robert Hall and Carl Fox argue that new, comprehensive and transnational strategies are required to deal with the security challenges of the 21st century. Frank J. Cilluffo and Daniel Rankin of the Center for Strategic and International Studies urge a flexible, comprehensive and coordinated strategy to fight terrorism. Timothy Shimeall, Phil Williams and Casey Dunlevy of the CERT Analysis Center of Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, argue that defence planning has to incorporate the virtual world to limit physical damage in the real. Elsewhere,Willem Matser of the Office of NATO's Special Adviser for Central and Eastern Europe examines the evolution in NATO-Russian relations since 11 September and Osman Yavuzalp of NATO's Political Affairs Division considers the Alliance's relations with its Central Asian Partners. In the interview, Ted Whiteside of NATO's WMD Centre describes the work of his centre. In the debate, Keith Payne of the National Institute for Public Policy and Joseph Cirincione of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace discuss how missile defence fits into security spending priorities in the wake of 11 September. In the review, Petr Lunak, outreach editor in NATO's Office of Information and Press, considers how documents discovered in Warsaw Pact archives are influencing and challenging conventional interpretations of the Cold War alliances. Statistics illustrating international terrorism and a map indicating the nationalities of the dead from 11 September round out the issue.

Christopher Bennett