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Other Publications > Study Introduction

A Study of the Benefits and Participation in a Selection of Non-military NATO/CCMS Pilot Studies and Ad Hoc Projects

March 2001
Report No. A-2001/01

Professor Paul Bardos, r3 Environmental Technology Limited, UK.


CONTENTS

  1. INTRODUCTION
  2. FELLOWSHIP AIMS AND METHODS

    1. The Questionnaire
    2. Publications
    3. The Internet

  3. FELLOWSHIP FINDINGS

    1. Results
    2. Analysis

  4. DISCUSSION

    1. Benefit of Pilot Studies
    2. Range of Topics and Issues
    3. CCMS Publications
    4. Internet Dissemination of Pilot Study Findings
    5. Collaboration With Other International Organisations
    6. Involvement of Partner Countries
    7. Financial Issues
    8. Following Up Pilot Studies
    9. Best Practice Guidance and Management Monitoring for Pilot Studies
    10. Other Suggestions

  5. CONCLUSIONS
  6. FURTHER WORK
  7. REFERENCES
  8. ABBREVIATIONS USED

ANNEXES

  1. OVERVIEW OF THE NATO CCMS [Pdf 172 Kb]
  2. SUMMARIES OF THE PILOT STUDIES SURVEYED [Pdf 192 Kb]
  3. OVERVIEW STATISTICS FOR THE PILOT STUDIES SURVEYED [Pdf 40 Kb]
  4. RESPONSES FROM PILOT STUDIES TO SURVEY QUESTIONS [Pdf 72 Kb]
  5. ANALYSIS OF QUESTIONNAIRES [Pdf 32 Kb]
  6. QUESTIONNAIRE FORM CIRCULATED


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The author gratefully acknowledges the help of Mr Nick Bennison, an excellent researcher and co-worker, and also Sue and Helen at Headstart Office and Secretarial Services.

Publishing Organisation:

NATO Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society
© March 2001

All rights reserved. No part of this document may be produced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior permission of NATO/CCMS. The authorship and origin of this document must be acknowledged for any use of it in whole or in part.

The views expressed in this document are not necessarily those of NATO or r 3 Environmental Technology Limited. Its officers, servant or agents, and Paul Bardos, accept no liability whatsoever for any loss or damage arising from the interpretation or use of the information, or reliance upon views contained herein.

Confidentiality status: Open

Statement of use

This report summarises the findings of research carried out for a NATO/CCMS Fellowship 976833. The information within this document is for use by the CCMS and others the CCMS deems appropriate who are considering non-military NATO/CCMS Pilot Studies.

Professor Paul Bardos
r3 Environmental Technology Ltd
PO Box 58
Ware
Hertfordshire
SG12 0YY
Fax: +44 1920 485607
E-mail: paul@r3environmental.co.uk
Web site: http://www.r3environmental.co.uk


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

NATO's Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society (CCMS) decided in 1999 to carry out an evaluation of its non-military related work as part of an internal assessment of its role as an international organisation. In this respect, in February 2000 they awarded Professor Paul Bardos of r 3 Environmental Technology Ltd a CCMS Fellow Fellowship (976833) to assess the benefit of a range of non-military Pilot and other studies to NATO and Partner countries. The study also reported on the range of topics and issues tackled by the Pilot Studies and their participation.

  1. Deprived Urban Areas
  2. Disaster Preparedness Plans Responding to Chemical Accidents
  3. Dose Response Analysis and Biologically Based Risk Assessment for Initiator and Promoter Carcinogens
  4. Evaluation of Demonstrated & Emerging Technologies for the Treatment of Contaminated Land and Groundwater (Phases I and II)
  5. Indoor Air Quality
  6. International Technical Meetings on Air Pollution and its Application
  7. Management of Industrial Toxic Wastes & Substances Research
  8. Methodology, Focalisation, Evaluation and Scope of the Environmental Impact Assessment
  9. Pollution Prevention Strategies for Sustainable Development
  10. Protection of Astronomic & Geophysical Sites
  11. Review of Environmental Projects of the Caspian Sea for the Planning of Future Activities
  12. Review of Ongoing Black Sea Projects for the Planning of Future Activities

"Benefit" was assessed in terms of landmark achievements, particularly in supporting Partner countries; dissemination of information; contributions to training activities, stimulation of research and development. Information was collected from the following sources: a questionnaire sent to Pilot Study directors, current CCMS publications and reports; and the Internet. Pilot Study directors were also asked for their views on how Pilot Study management and CCMS support might be enhanced. While the information collected was incomplete, the amount of information and the help received from the majority of the studies surveyed was substantial. It is apparent that most Pilot Study Directors feel genuine warmth towards CCMS, and consider their involvement with CCMS to be a privilege.

Undoubtedly, there is and has been a major benefit from the CCMS programme in stimulating international developments across a diverse range of topics that represent challenges to modern society. A real asset of the CCMS is that these topics are "self-selected" from different NATO and Partner countries interests. 44 countries took part in 9 of the Pilot Studies surveyed, including 17 Partner countries, 19 NATO countries and four other countries. CCMS is a unique international organisation in terms of the countries it brings together, the goals it works towards, and the manner in which its Pilot Studies are conducted. The provision of support to a civilian programme strengthens personal trust and co-operation among participants. This plays a key role in the core NATO objective of increased stability in the Euro-Atlantic region.

The conclusions of this survey are as follows.

  1. The range of topics addressed by the non-military Pilot Studies is pertinent to the needs of Society, and involve subjects that investigate and help solve "challenges to modern society".

  2. However, the CCMS could better cater for organised follow-ups to maintain networks established by Pilot Studies. This would doubtless lead to an increased workload for CCMS, strongly implying a need for increased resources.

  3. It is imperative that delays in preparing and publishing CCMS Reports are avoided, to make information available as quickly as possible. Many of the Pilot Studies involve subjects where the science, technology and legislation move at a fast pace. Provision of CCMS support for producing a Pilot Study publications would be very beneficial in avoiding delays.

  4. The CCMS web site has the potential to be a much more important resource, including, for example, web links to sources of further information, publication downloads and specific Pilot Study work areas. Pilot Studies could also provide their own web pages, for example from the host institutions of Pilot Study Directors, which could be linked to the main CCMS web site. The costs of such web pages are relatively low, and the Contaminated Land Study is clearly showing the way forward with its provision of information and downloads via www.clu-in.org/intup.

  5. CCMS could benefit from a more formal interface with other international organisations.

  6. The encouragement of Partner country participants in Pilot Study work is a positive and worthwhile development within CCMS. This Review has shown that co-operation, exchange of scientific information, and the development of legislation are of benefit to all countries.

  7. There is a willingness to encourage more Pilot Study gatherings in Partner countries, though this has not always been possible. CCMS needs to assess the barriers that exist to this and determine how they might be overcome.

  8. While this survey has only assessed a limited number of Pilot Studies, a more comprehensive retrospective review of Pilot Studies is not recommended. A better use of resources to set up a monitoring and assessment system for current and future Pilot Studies and to investigate other measures of the usefulness of CCMS and its Pilot Studies, such as a cost benefit analysis of CCMS for NATO, and an investigation of Partner countries' perception of CCMS value.


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