Escape from Crimea: the journalist

Full video transcript

Escape from Crimea: the journalist

Following Crimea’s annexation

by Russia in 2014,

the new authorities promised

a better life for its new citizens.

But we interviewed

several Crimeans living in Kiev

and found that some had left

their home region because of fear.

In the second story

a journalist explains

why he escaped from Crimea.

I’ll give you two examples of

what happened with my journalists.

Before the annexation, on 23 or 24

February, our journalists observed

that military trucks

without identification marking,

with armed people arrived in Yalta,

where our editorial office was based.

They entered the sanatorium of the

Black Sea Fleet in the centre of town.

He started filming

their arrival and unloading.

They saw this and tried to detain

him, but he managed to escape

as he had a better knowledge

of the town than them.

It was a Special Forces unit

of the Russian army,

which seized the border post in Yalta

and the air defence complexes.

Our second journalist,

a very fragile girl,

suffered when she filmed the men

surrounding

the border guards building.

They tried to take her camera

and almost broke her wrist.

So there were quite a few cases

like that all around Crimea.

That's because

journalists all over the country,

Crimea included, were used

to act as they act in a free country,

without regard

to the police, militia, the military...

It turned out that things were

not the same, not the same already.

In February-March in Crimea,

we registered over a hundred

cases of detaining, attacking,

beating and other aggressive

actions against free press.

Only in Crimea, yes.

Well, it’s really

a very serious problem.

The beginning lies in the law

of the 9th of May, as we call it.

It is the law

of the Russian Federation.

The gist of the law is as follows:

if you are a journalist

and you use the word occupation

or the word annexation

in your publication or programme,

then you can receive

up to five years in prison.

If you are a blogger

and you have over 3,000 followers

and you did the same, you can

receive up to five years as well.

And if you talk about this

in public transport,

in a shop or at the market, you can

get up to three years in prison.

This is considered an infringement

on their sovereignty and extremism.

Escape from Crimea: the journalist

Following Crimea’s annexation

by Russia in 2014,

the new authorities promised

a better life for its new citizens.

But we interviewed

several Crimeans living in Kiev

and found that some had left

their home region because of fear.

In the second story

a journalist explains

why he escaped from Crimea.

I’ll give you two examples of

what happened with my journalists.

Before the annexation, on 23 or 24

February, our journalists observed

that military trucks

without identification marking,

with armed people arrived in Yalta,

where our editorial office was based.

They entered the sanatorium of the

Black Sea Fleet in the centre of town.

He started filming

their arrival and unloading.

They saw this and tried to detain

him, but he managed to escape

as he had a better knowledge

of the town than them.

It was a Special Forces unit

of the Russian army,

which seized the border post in Yalta

and the air defence complexes.

Our second journalist,

a very fragile girl,

suffered when she filmed the men

surrounding

the border guards building.

They tried to take her camera

and almost broke her wrist.

So there were quite a few cases

like that all around Crimea.

That's because

journalists all over the country,

Crimea included, were used

to act as they act in a free country,

without regard

to the police, militia, the military...

It turned out that things were

not the same, not the same already.

In February-March in Crimea,

we registered over a hundred

cases of detaining, attacking,

beating and other aggressive

actions against free press.

Only in Crimea, yes.

Well, it’s really

a very serious problem.

The beginning lies in the law

of the 9th of May, as we call it.

It is the law

of the Russian Federation.

The gist of the law is as follows:

if you are a journalist

and you use the word occupation

or the word annexation

in your publication or programme,

then you can receive

up to five years in prison.

If you are a blogger

and you have over 3,000 followers

and you did the same, you can

receive up to five years as well.

And if you talk about this

in public transport,

in a shop or at the market, you can

get up to three years in prison.

This is considered an infringement

on their sovereignty and extremism.