Modern defence: better sm
where the experts come to talk

Modern defence: better smart than sexy?

A huge array of equipment that has flowed into Afghanistan over more than a decade must now leave in more or less 12 months. This means calling in some specialist kit to get the job done, including massive air transport planes. NATO Review looks at how several countries have shared this kit, saving money and time.

Modern defence:

better smart than sexy?

This is the kind

of investment that we think of

when talking about defence budgets:

fighter jets and high-end equipment.

But with budgets tight,

it’s the more practical,

but less glamorous areas,

which are adapting best

to the need for smart defence.

And if you're looking

for an example of smart defence,

you can’t do much better than this.

As NATO continues

one of the biggest redeployments,

shifting a lot of equipment from

one side of the world to the other,

several nations devised

a smart way of carrying out the move.

This plane,

funded by several countries,

has just come from Afghanistan as

part of the redeployment from ISAF.

Now it will be unloading

pieces of equipment

that have served over there

and are now coming back over here.

Instead of each country buying the

heavy lift equipment for this move,

equipment which may

not be needed again for some time,

14 nations have got together to rent

time on these huge Ruslan aircraft.

It’s paid for under SALIS

or Strategic Airlift Interim Solution.

This allows the countries to use

the plane only when they need it.

This Czech equipment was being

used in Logar just a few weeks ago.

It’s been packed up and transported

halfway round the world, via Baku.

It’s arrived today and now

it’s back home in the Czech Republic.

Today we’ve come

from Azerbaijan, Baku.

First we came there

from Afghanistan, from Kabul,

with some cargo to bring here,

some boxes with military cargo.

We airline all over the world,

but usually we have

one or two aircrafts

which perform such flights

from Afghanistan to Europe.

This move to share costs is one that

in this case both the military

and politicians can see the benefit of.

I think this smart transport

is a smart move,

both from a commercial point of view,

a Russian-Ukrainian company,

as well as for the countries

who have joined their forces.

These 14 NATO countries

and 2 PfP countries,

who joined this initiative, SALIS,

that’s quite a good example

of how to put forces together

and money together for something,

which we cannot afford

as single individual nations.

This works

for non-NATO countries too.

One good example also in this region

is the strategic airlift capacity

that we are able to participate in.

It’s clear that Sweden would

not be able to have that capacity

without being able

to join that specific project.

The Ruslan example

shows smart defence working,

but few are claiming

that smart defence can always work.

If you decide to cooperate with

some nation on a specific capability,

then of course you need

to have a very good guarantee

that this capability will be provided

to you at a time when you need it.

Modern defence:

better smart than sexy?

This is the kind

of investment that we think of

when talking about defence budgets:

fighter jets and high-end equipment.

But with budgets tight,

it’s the more practical,

but less glamorous areas,

which are adapting best

to the need for smart defence.

And if you're looking

for an example of smart defence,

you can’t do much better than this.

As NATO continues

one of the biggest redeployments,

shifting a lot of equipment from

one side of the world to the other,

several nations devised

a smart way of carrying out the move.

This plane,

funded by several countries,

has just come from Afghanistan as

part of the redeployment from ISAF.

Now it will be unloading

pieces of equipment

that have served over there

and are now coming back over here.

Instead of each country buying the

heavy lift equipment for this move,

equipment which may

not be needed again for some time,

14 nations have got together to rent

time on these huge Ruslan aircraft.

It’s paid for under SALIS

or Strategic Airlift Interim Solution.

This allows the countries to use

the plane only when they need it.

This Czech equipment was being

used in Logar just a few weeks ago.

It’s been packed up and transported

halfway round the world, via Baku.

It’s arrived today and now

it’s back home in the Czech Republic.

Today we’ve come

from Azerbaijan, Baku.

First we came there

from Afghanistan, from Kabul,

with some cargo to bring here,

some boxes with military cargo.

We airline all over the world,

but usually we have

one or two aircrafts

which perform such flights

from Afghanistan to Europe.

This move to share costs is one that

in this case both the military

and politicians can see the benefit of.

I think this smart transport

is a smart move,

both from a commercial point of view,

a Russian-Ukrainian company,

as well as for the countries

who have joined their forces.

These 14 NATO countries

and 2 PfP countries,

who joined this initiative, SALIS,

that’s quite a good example

of how to put forces together

and money together for something,

which we cannot afford

as single individual nations.

This works

for non-NATO countries too.

One good example also in this region

is the strategic airlift capacity

that we are able to participate in.

It’s clear that Sweden would

not be able to have that capacity

without being able

to join that specific project.

The Ruslan example

shows smart defence working,

but few are claiming

that smart defence can always work.

If you decide to cooperate with

some nation on a specific capability,

then of course you need

to have a very good guarantee

that this capability will be provided

to you at a time when you need it.

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