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Yemen: 10 reasons to worry

Want a quick guide to the problems in Yemen? Here's a three minute video which gives the key information about Yemen, why it matters, the challenges it poses and how it could affect all of us.

10 of Yemen's problems explained in a simple three minute video.

This video's ITN/Reuters copyrighted library material licensed by NATO cannot be used as part of a new production without consent of the copyright holder.

 Subtitles: On / Off

Yemen is one of the most

water-scarce areas in the world.

An estimated 80% of conflicts

in Yemen are based on water.

Up to 40% of water

is used to grow 'qat' drug.

Shortages will cause a major increase

in internally displaced people.

Yemen is the poorest Arab country.

Nearly half the population

lives on less than $2 a day.

Around 50% of Yemenis are illiterate.

Yemen's population

will double by 2030.

National unemployment is 35%.

For young men

the figure is much higher.

Yemeni workers abroad send home

around $1 billion a year.

But more countries are now

rejecting Yemeni unskilled workers.

Yemen's challenging landscape

makes central control difficult.

People largely live

in one of Yemen's 135,000 villages.

Only one third of the population

lives in urban areas.

Corruption, tribalism, vague borders

also complicate governing.

Oil accounts for around 75%

of Yemen's economy.

But Yemen's oil reserves are coming

to an end, perhaps as soon as 2017.

Falling prices saw the oil revenue

drop by 75% between 2008-2009.

A state fuel subsidy for citizens

accounts for 11% of GDP.

To increase hard currency revenue

Yemen has tried to promote tourism.

But there have been numerous

attacks on Western tourists.

In 2009, 8 Spanish tourists

were killed by a car bomb.

Numerous tourists

have been kidnapped

most are released alive - but not all.

By 2009, one third of the prisoners

in Guantanamo were from Yemen.

More Islamist fighters are going

home from Afghanistan and Iraq.

In the first six months of 2005, 700

Yemeni fighters returned from Iraq.

Yemen has already been

the scene of jihad attacks,

notably on the USS Cole.

Formed in January 2009, AQAP has

launched attacks in and from Yemen.

The 2009 Christmas day 'underpants

bomber' had been trained in Yemen.

The 23 year old attended lectures at

the radical Iman University in Sana'a.

The university was established

by Osama bin Laden's mentor.

Yemen is home

to several radical Islamist clerics.

One of them is Anwar al-Awlaki,

'the Bin Laden of the Internet'.

Nidal Malik Hasan,

who killed 13 people at Fort Hood,

exchanged e-mails with Al-Awlaki.

Al-Awlaki praised Hasan's shootings

and encouraged others to follow suit.

There are increasing problems

between north and south Yemen.

Despite unification in 1990,

southerners complain

of discrimination.

The Al Houthi conflict has raged

for six years in northern Saada.

The conflict has led to at least

250,000 internally displaced people.

Yemen is one of the most

water-scarce areas in the world.

An estimated 80% of conflicts

in Yemen are based on water.

Up to 40% of water

is used to grow 'qat' drug.

Shortages will cause a major increase

in internally displaced people.

Yemen is the poorest Arab country.

Nearly half the population

lives on less than $2 a day.

Around 50% of Yemenis are illiterate.

Yemen's population

will double by 2030.

National unemployment is 35%.

For young men

the figure is much higher.

Yemeni workers abroad send home

around $1 billion a year.

But more countries are now

rejecting Yemeni unskilled workers.

Yemen's challenging landscape

makes central control difficult.

People largely live

in one of Yemen's 135,000 villages.

Only one third of the population

lives in urban areas.

Corruption, tribalism, vague borders

also complicate governing.

Oil accounts for around 75%

of Yemen's economy.

But Yemen's oil reserves are coming

to an end, perhaps as soon as 2017.

Falling prices saw the oil revenue

drop by 75% between 2008-2009.

A state fuel subsidy for citizens

accounts for 11% of GDP.

To increase hard currency revenue

Yemen has tried to promote tourism.

But there have been numerous

attacks on Western tourists.

In 2009, 8 Spanish tourists

were killed by a car bomb.

Numerous tourists

have been kidnapped

most are released alive - but not all.

By 2009, one third of the prisoners

in Guantanamo were from Yemen.

More Islamist fighters are going

home from Afghanistan and Iraq.

In the first six months of 2005, 700

Yemeni fighters returned from Iraq.

Yemen has already been

the scene of jihad attacks,

notably on the USS Cole.

Formed in January 2009, AQAP has

launched attacks in and from Yemen.

The 2009 Christmas day 'underpants

bomber' had been trained in Yemen.

The 23 year old attended lectures at

the radical Iman University in Sana'a.

The university was established

by Osama bin Laden's mentor.

Yemen is home

to several radical Islamist clerics.

One of them is Anwar al-Awlaki,

'the Bin Laden of the Internet'.

Nidal Malik Hasan,

who killed 13 people at Fort Hood,

exchanged e-mails with Al-Awlaki.

Al-Awlaki praised Hasan's shootings

and encouraged others to follow suit.

There are increasing problems

between north and south Yemen.

Despite unification in 1990,

southerners complain

of discrimination.

The Al Houthi conflict has raged

for six years in northern Saada.

The conflict has led to at least

250,000 internally displaced people.

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