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Growing fears: the heightened fear of North Korea's intentions following its underground nuclear test in May 2009 has only intensified. It's been followed by it test-firing short-range missiles, sinking a South Korea corvette and shelling a South Korean island, with loss of both military and civilian life. North Korea is widely believed to be in the midst of a succession process, making it even more unpredictable.

In April, leaders from around the world arrived in Washington to recommit to tackling major nuclear security threats. This ended with agreements on better securing nuclear materials, initial decisions on reducing nuclear arsenals and measures on how to prevent terrorists from obtaining nuclear capabilities.

Security fears about, from and in Yemen continued in 2010. Following attacks such as Fort Hood in 2009, new threats in 2010 included bombs hidden in printer cartridges. Radical Islamic clerics saw their influence play out in a murderous attack in the US at Fort Hood. Nidal Malik Hassan, who was employed at the base, turned his weapon on his colleagues, killing 13. Hassan exchanged several e-mails with the Yemen-based radical cleric Anwar al-Awlaki (dubbed 'the bin Laden of the Internet') before the attack.

© REUTERS

October 2010 saw the 10th anniversary of the United Nations attempt to provide the platform for better integration of women in security (the so-called UNSCR 1325). Major steps have been taken. In Spain, for example, 1 in 8 of its armed forces are women. And women have proved invaluable in Afghanistan in bridging cultural divides. But women still suffer disproportionately heavily from war.

'Change is coming to America' was one of President Obama's famous election slogans. But in 2010, he saw an altogether different kind of change. A backlash to the economic downturn and some domestic reforms saw the rise (and election of some members) of the new radical Tea Party. And now key security deals, such as the new Start Treaty, have become part of the battle in US politics.

November saw the Lisbon Summit agree a new Strategic Concept for NATO. It also brought together leaders from the UN, EU, Russia, and Afghanistan. The Summit provided ample examples of a new spirit of working together to resolve major global security challenges.

© NATO

And finally, 2010 saw the latest football World Cup. In our special edition looking at the links between security and the beautiful game, we revealed that Osama bin Laden is an Arsenal fan. He attended several football matches at Arsenal's Highbury stadium while in London in 1994. Arsenal football club, upon learning of their new famous fan after 9/11, issued a statement saying he was no longer welcome at the ground.

Growing fears: the heightened fear of North Korea's intentions following its underground nuclear test in May 2009 has only intensified. It's been followed by it test-firing short-range missiles, sinking a South Korea corvette and shelling a South Korean island, with loss of both military and civilian life. North Korea is widely believed to be in the midst of a succession process, making it even more unpredictable.

In April, leaders from around the world arrived in Washington to recommit to tackling major nuclear security threats. This ended with agreements on better securing nuclear materials, initial decisions on reducing nuclear arsenals and measures on how to prevent terrorists from obtaining nuclear capabilities.

Security fears about, from and in Yemen continued in 2010. Following attacks such as Fort Hood in 2009, new threats in 2010 included bombs hidden in printer cartridges. Radical Islamic clerics saw their influence play out in a murderous attack in the US at Fort Hood. Nidal Malik Hassan, who was employed at the base, turned his weapon on his colleagues, killing 13. Hassan exchanged several e-mails with the Yemen-based radical cleric Anwar al-Awlaki (dubbed 'the bin Laden of the Internet') before the attack.

© REUTERS

October 2010 saw the 10th anniversary of the United Nations attempt to provide the platform for better integration of women in security (the so-called UNSCR 1325). Major steps have been taken. In Spain, for example, 1 in 8 of its armed forces are women. And women have proved invaluable in Afghanistan in bridging cultural divides. But women still suffer disproportionately heavily from war.

'Change is coming to America' was one of President Obama's famous election slogans. But in 2010, he saw an altogether different kind of change. A backlash to the economic downturn and some domestic reforms saw the rise (and election of some members) of the new radical Tea Party. And now key security deals, such as the new Start Treaty, have become part of the battle in US politics.

November saw the Lisbon Summit agree a new Strategic Concept for NATO. It also brought together leaders from the UN, EU, Russia, and Afghanistan. The Summit provided ample examples of a new spirit of working together to resolve major global security challenges.

© NATO

And finally, 2010 saw the latest football World Cup. In our special edition looking at the links between security and the beautiful game, we revealed that Osama bin Laden is an Arsenal fan. He attended several football matches at Arsenal's Highbury stadium while in London in 1994. Arsenal football club, upon learning of their new famous fan after 9/11, issued a statement saying he was no longer welcome at the ground.

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