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Lisbon: the perfect birthplace for NATO's new Strategic Concept?

As some of the world's major leaders arrive in Lisbon to cement NATO's new Strategic Concept, NATO Review looks at how the city might be the perfect location to sign the concept.

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As some of the world's

major leaders arrive in Lisbon

to cement NATO's

new Strategic Concept,

NATO Review looks at how

the city might be the perfect location

to sign the concept.

It is a city,

which like the new Strategic Concept,

combines the old and the new.

As NATO constructs

its new document,

so Lisbon is famous

for its own constructions.

And not just the buildings.

It has been the location where

two key EU treaties were signed.

But now it's NATO's turn. And as

many of its leaders return to Lisbon,

the city provides telling reminders

of how some security issues

have changed.

And some haven't.

The city knows from experience

the importance of security.

It was attacked several times

over the centuries

by many people,

including the Romans and the Moors.

It built up its defences, including

its famous Castelo di São Jorge,

to protect itself.

But now times have changed.

This, for example, was a perfect

defence point in centuries past:

near the sea for trade and easy to

defend high land; a view for miles.

But in the 21st century these

characteristics have less relevance.

Today, your firewall is often

more important than your city wall.

But not all security threats from

olden times have gone completely,

even in this modern,

globalised world.

There's not much better place

to illustrate a globalised,

interconnected world than a port.

Here in Lisbon, ships from

all around the world form part

of the 90% of world trade

that's moved by sea.

A figure that grew enormously

as new markets opened up.

But as well as illustrating the

development globalisation brought,

ports are also a reminder that

some threats have not disappeared

and have just evolved

to the modern day.

One example is centuries ago

ships leaving Lisbon's port

would have been very wary

about potential pirate attacks.

And today, ships leaving

the port of Lisbon may still be wary

of a new kind of piracy attack,

albeit more modern and further away,

but the threat still exists today.

And Lisbon is well used

to crisis management,

having suffered several earthquakes.

The biggest being in 1755.

Finally, Lisbon is

Europe's most western capital city.

As its statue of Jesus

looks out over the Atlantic

to its counterpart on the other side,

many will feel it is appropriate

that the next stage of the Alliance

should be signed by Lisbon's shores.

As some of the world's

major leaders arrive in Lisbon

to cement NATO's

new Strategic Concept,

NATO Review looks at how

the city might be the perfect location

to sign the concept.

It is a city,

which like the new Strategic Concept,

combines the old and the new.

As NATO constructs

its new document,

so Lisbon is famous

for its own constructions.

And not just the buildings.

It has been the location where

two key EU treaties were signed.

But now it's NATO's turn. And as

many of its leaders return to Lisbon,

the city provides telling reminders

of how some security issues

have changed.

And some haven't.

The city knows from experience

the importance of security.

It was attacked several times

over the centuries

by many people,

including the Romans and the Moors.

It built up its defences, including

its famous Castelo di São Jorge,

to protect itself.

But now times have changed.

This, for example, was a perfect

defence point in centuries past:

near the sea for trade and easy to

defend high land; a view for miles.

But in the 21st century these

characteristics have less relevance.

Today, your firewall is often

more important than your city wall.

But not all security threats from

olden times have gone completely,

even in this modern,

globalised world.

There's not much better place

to illustrate a globalised,

interconnected world than a port.

Here in Lisbon, ships from

all around the world form part

of the 90% of world trade

that's moved by sea.

A figure that grew enormously

as new markets opened up.

But as well as illustrating the

development globalisation brought,

ports are also a reminder that

some threats have not disappeared

and have just evolved

to the modern day.

One example is centuries ago

ships leaving Lisbon's port

would have been very wary

about potential pirate attacks.

And today, ships leaving

the port of Lisbon may still be wary

of a new kind of piracy attack,

albeit more modern and further away,

but the threat still exists today.

And Lisbon is well used

to crisis management,

having suffered several earthquakes.

The biggest being in 1755.

Finally, Lisbon is

Europe's most western capital city.

As its statue of Jesus

looks out over the Atlantic

to its counterpart on the other side,

many will feel it is appropriate

that the next stage of the Alliance

should be signed by Lisbon's shores.

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