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Updated: 15-Apr-2002 NATO Review



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1

NATO'S PUBLIC OPINION SEMINAR
INDICATES CONTINUING,
BUT NOT UNSHAKEABLE, SUPPORT

Erika v.C. Bruce, Director of NATO' s Office of Information and Press

For the past several years, NATO's Office of Information and Press has organized a public opinion seminar as a means of keeping in touch with the perceptions and attitudes which people have toward NATO and its role in European-Atlantic security. It is one of the important ways through which the International Secretariat and national delegations can adjust and adapt their information programmes to the needs and interests of the Alliance. It is a simple response to the principle that the health of the organization depends onthe strength of the support and understanding it receives from the publics of its member nations. In the rapidly changing political environment of the 1990s, these seminars are perhaps more important than ever before.


 

No 2

1992



2

THE SECURITY STRUCTURES
OF A CHANGING CONTINENT
A TURKISH VIEW

Hikmet Cetin, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Turkey

Dramatic and fast-moving developments, culminating in, and ushered in by, the 1989 revolutions would hardly have been thought possible even as late as the mid-1980s. Through them, the Cold War order collapsed. Seldom in the 20th century has any chain of events had broader implications. For nearly three years now, we have been witnessing successive, at times disorderly and painful, waves of change which have not yet run their course.


3

WEU'S POST-MAASTRICHT AGEND Dr. Willem Van Eekelen, Secretary General of Western European Union

Late in 1991, the Buffalo News published a cartoon in the form of a couple of maps. The first showed Europe before the 1989-1991 revolutions, a much fragmented Western Europe facing a compact Warsaw Pact. The second, depicting Europe after the revolutions, showed the reverse picture, a united Western and Central Europe facing the many republics and nations which had succeeded the defunct Soviet Union and Yugoslav Federation. Such a degree of unity may well correspond to the cartoon, provided Europe's move towards a Political Union with a common foreign and security policy quickly gathers momentum in the wake of the decisions taken by the European Summit in Maastricht in the Netherlands last December.


4

CSCE MARK II: BACK TO HELSINKI
FROM PARIS VIA BERLIN AND PRAGUE

Christopher Anstis,Director, International Security Policy and CSCE Affairs Division,Department of External Affairs, Canada

Although the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE) began in Helsinki scarcely 20 years ago, its origins go back many decades, in fact to the 1930s, when the Soviet Commissar for Foreign Relations, Maxim Litvinov, tried to set up a collective security system in Europe. The Soviet Union had intended such an arrangement when it began to call for a European Security Conference not long after the second World War, but the result - the CSCE - turned out differently, the NATO Allies insisting on giving practical expression to the rights of citizens to leave their countries and freely return, as well as to impart and receive information.


5

ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES:
THE ROLE OF NATO

Dr. Paul C. Rambaut,NATO's Deputy Assistant Secretary General for Scientific and Environmental Affairs

Recently, the environmental situation in a European country was described in the following terms:

"A great part of our forests is dying; you would be disgusted if you dipped your finger into some of our rivers: there are places where it is almost impossible to breathe. In these areas people die earlier and children are born ill. From time to time they are even prohibited from leaving the house or opening a window. I have seen a television commercial for gas masks for children to wear to school. Large areas of our country have been transformed into lifeless moon landscapes. Our food products have been contaminated for years now..."



6

REASSURING EASTERN EUROPE
Professor Otto Pick

The following article, which is intended to contribute to the debate on the Alliance's role, especially in relation to the countries of Central and Eastern Europe, expresses the personal views of the author.


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