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Updated: 12-Apr-2002 NATO Review



Table of Contents


1

NATO TAKES UP ITS NEW AGENDA
Ambassador G. von Moltke, Assistant Secretary General of NATO's Political Affairs Division

The meeting of Allied Heads of State and Government in Rome on 7 and 8 November last year marked a decisive step in NATO's transformation and adaptation to the new situation in Europe. The Rome Declaration on Peace and Cooperation set out in broad conceptual terms a new series of objectives for the transformed Alliance to meet in this revolutionary era of European history.


 

No 1

1992



2

THE NEW EUROPE - A DANISH VIEW
Uffe Ellemann-Jensen, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Denmark

Europe - and the world - is presently undergoing tremendous changes. The Communist dictatorships in Eastern and Central Europe have been replaced by new states based on core values which, three years ago, could only have been described as Western - democracy, respect for human rights and the rule of law.


3

THE HAND OF FRIENDSHIP
THE PARLIAMENTARY CONTRIBUTION
Simon Lunn, Deputy Secretary General of the North Atlantic Assembly

A timely reminder of the essential, yet often overlooked, parliamentary contribution to the current efforts to reach out to the countries of Central and Eastern Europe was provided recently by the North Atlantic Assembly when it joined with the Lithuanian Parliament in sponsoring an international seminar in Vilnius on Baltic Security Requirements.


4

THE HAND OF FRIENDSHIP THE MILITARY CONTACTS PROGRAMME
Lt. Col. Angus Watt, Military Contacts Branch, Plans and Policy Division,NATO's International Military Staff

It was Winston Churchill who said, almost 40 years ago, that 'it is better to jaw-jaw than to war-war'. Indeed, while NATO's deterrent military role has always been a cornerstone of the Alliance, it is equally true that the pursuit of dialogue and cooperation has also been extremely important. In fact, this twin track of deterrence and dialogue was enshrined in the HARMEL DOCTRINE which the Alliance formally adopted in 1967. Unfortunately, the strictures and stereotypes of the Cold War impeded this attempt to communicate for many years. However, recent times have seen a new sense of importance attached to the task of dialogue with the nations of Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and this is beginning to bear fruit.


5

OPEN SKIES AHEAD
Ralph J. Lysyshyn,Head of the Canadian Delegation to the Open Skies Negotiation and Canada's Deputy Permanent Representative to NATO.

Once the effect of the Gulf conflict on the airline industry is over, air traffic congestion and delays in Europe, which had assumed crises proportions during the last few years, triggered off by an explosive increase in civilian air traffic, can be expected to reoccur. Yet the finite European airspace also has to accommodate allied air forces which must retain maximum freedom of operation. These potentially conflicting demands can only be harmonized by careful civil/military coordination.


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