NATO/EAPC Policy for the implementation of UNSCR 1325 on Women, Peace and Security and related resolutions

  • 01 Apr. 2014 -
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  • Last updated: 24 Jun. 2014 15:08

Introduction

  1. NATO’s Policy on Women, Peace and Security has been developed within the Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council (EAPC). Afghanistan, Australia, Japan, Jordan and the United Arab Emirates have also participated in its development.  It builds on the previous NATO/EAPC policy, and on experiences and lessons learned from, in particular, cooperative security and NATO-led operations.
  2. NATO and its partners1 recognize the disproportionate impact conflict and post-conflict situations in many instances have on women and girls.  They also recognize the importance of ensuring women’s active and meaningful participation in decision making and in security institutions and remain committed to contribute to the full  implementation of the Women, Peace and Security agenda, as reflected in the United Nations Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1325 and all subsequent related resolutions.  NATO and its partners will continue to work towards the participation of women in conflict prevention, management and resolution,and peace building, as well as in post-conflict efforts and cooperation.  NATO and its partners remain committed to work towards the protection of women’s and girls’ rights, taking into due consideration their security and protection needs and the prevention of conflict-related sexual and gender-based violence. 
  3. Our work on Women, Peace and Security is fundamental to the realization of our common values of individual liberty, democracy, human rights and the rule of law, and our obligations under the Charter of the United Nations and other sources of international law.  These common values and legal obligations cannot be fulfilled if women cannot participate fully and freely, or if their rights are not respected.
  4. The Security Council adopted Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security on 31 October 2000.  The Resolution reaffirms the important role of women in conflict and post-conflict situations, and urges all actors to increase the participation of women and to incorporate gender perspectives in peace and security efforts.  Since 2000, six additional UNSCRs on Women, Peace and Security have been adopted: UNSCR 1820 on 19 June 2008, UNSCR 1888 on 30 September 2009, UNSCR 1889 on 5 October 2009, UNSCR 1960 on 15 December 2010, UNSCR 2106 on 24 June 2013, and UNSCR 2122 on 18 October 2013.  These “related Resolutions” complement UNSCR 1325 and deepen the commitments to the broader aspects of the Women, Peace and Security agenda.  The International Community has paid particular attention to how to prevent and respond to sexual and gender-based violence conducted as a method or tactic of war, including through the Declaration of Commitment to End Sexual Violence in 2013.
  5. UNSCR 1325 and related Resolutions form a solid policy basis for NATO and its partners’ work on Women, Peace and Security.

Overarching Aim

  1. NATO’s fundamental and enduring purpose is to safeguard the freedom and security of all its members by political and military means.  In accordance with NATO’s Strategic Concept, this will be done through its three essential core tasks of collective defence, crisis management and cooperative security.  Within the context of NATO’s wider policy objectives and core tasks, NATO will continue to integrate a gender perspective into its work and contribute to the implementation of UNSCR 1325 and related Resolutions.
  2. NATO and its partners aim to contribute to the full implementation of the UN Security Council Resolutions on Women, Peace and Security by making this Policy an integral part of their everyday business in both civilian and military structures.
  3. NATO and its partners aim to ensure that a gender perspective is mainstreamed into policies, activities and efforts to prevent and resolve conflicts.  Due regard will be given to the social roles of both men and women and how these may lead to different risks and security needs. Attention will also be paid to how these roles may translate into different contributions to conflict prevention and resolution.
  4. NATO and its partners aim to yield a change in mind sets and behaviours in their institutions and promote awareness and positive changes.

Cooperative Security

  1. The area of cooperative security, with its wide network of relations between NATO and partner nations, as well as other organizations around the globe, provides a particular impetus for the Women, Peace and Security agenda.  Thus, NATO and its partners, working within and across the various partnership frameworks, and on the basis of any mandate for NATO-led operations and missions, will continue to further implement UNSCR 1325 and related Resolutions.
  2. NATO and its partners will continue to develop joint policy objectives and priorities on Women, Peace and Security and to support practical collaboration within and across partnership frameworks.  Collaboration in this regard may address preventive measures, cooperation in both crisis and post-conflict situations, including capacity building efforts as requested.  Our collaboration will include, but not be limited to, joint political messaging, exchanges of information, best practices and expertise, exercises and training activities, and cooperation through the NATO Science for Peace Programme 2.
  3. Cooperation with other international organizations3 is essential to advance the overall agenda on Women, Peace and Security.  Consultation and collaboration with organizations such as the United Nations, the European Union, the Organization for Cooperation and Security in Europe and the African Union offer considerable potential for moving this agenda forward.
  4. In keeping governments, public institutions and international organizations accountable, civil society has been instrumental in promoting the Women, Peace and Security agenda.  NATO and its partners recognize the important role civil society continues to play in promoting women’s and girls’ empowerment and in protecting their rights.  We will seek to ensure a continued dialogue with relevant actors within civil society, including in the planning and execution of any NATO-led operations and missions.

Crisis Management and NATO-led Operations and Missions

  1. The best way to manage conflicts is to prevent them from happening.  NATO and its partners will continue to monitor and analyze the international environment and will integrate a gender perspective into this monitoring and analysis.
  2. In a situation where conflict does erupt, NATO may be prepared to assist in crisis management, together with operational partners, as decided, through a NATO-led operation or mission.  In such an instance, to enhance the operational effectiveness and to ensure implementation of UNSCR 1325 and related Resolutions, NATO and its operational partners will ensure that a gender perspective is included in conflict analysis, planning, execution, assessment and evaluation of any NATO-led operation or mission.
  3. NATO and its operational partners will seek to ensure that Gender Advisers are deployed as part of the Command Group; that women are deployed at all levels in NATO-led operations and missions and that both troops and commanders have undergone gender training necessary for their role and level.  This will ensure that a gender perspective is integrated and that UNSCR 1325 and related Resolutions are implemented in the context of the NATO-led operation or mission.

National Contributions

  1. Nations have the primary responsibility for ensuring the implementation of the UNSCRs on Women, Peace and Security.  The provision of trained troops and experts on gender issues, as well as a better gender balance in NATO-led forces depend entirely on national decisions.
  2. Nations are encouraged to make UNSCR 1325 and related Resolutions an integral part of their defence and security policies and activities, and in collaborative frameworks between NATO and its partners.
  3. Defence and related security capacity building should aim at developing institutions accessible and responsive to the needs of both men and women and at including the promotion of women’s equal participation in national armed forces.  This can be achieved by including in the training and education curricula for armed forces and other personnel in the security and defence institutions specific elements focused on gender and UNSCR 1325 and related Resolutions.This includes elements on how to take the protection needs of women into account, as well as to prevent, recognize and respond to conflict-related sexual and gender-based violence.
  4. National initiatives, including through the development and implementation of National Action Plans and other strategic national initiatives, are essential for making progress in this regard.

Cross-CuttingEnablers

Human Resource Policies
  1. NATO and its partners are committed to show the leadership required to dismantle existing barriers to full implementation of UNSCR 1325 and related Resolutions and will ensure that troops as well as military and civilian leaders have the necessary awareness and knowledge.
  2. A better gender balance within our institutions is a goal in itself, and is also a means for improving performance. NATO and its partners are committed to achieving this goal, and to ensuring a respectful and safe working environment that will allow all to reach their full potential.
  3. NATO and its partners will give specific consideration to the recruitment and support of female leaders both in civilian and military structures in the defence and security area.

Education, Training and Exercises
  1. Education, training and exercises are essential tools to raise awareness and foster changes in mindset and behaviours.  Any reform efforts within security and defence institutions, as well as proper conflict analysis, planning and execution of operations and missions must be underpinned by education and training on gender aspects.  In this context, both the participation and the protection needs of women and girls should also be taken into consideration.
  2. NATO and its partners are committed to continue to develop appropriate education and training programmes and tools at the national level as well as under the auspices of NATO, and to integrate a gender perspective in their exercises and programmes.
  3. NATO and its partners will ensure curricula on gender training will continue to be developed for personnel and leaders in military and civilian structures related to defence and security, and in particular that troops and military and civilian leaders receive training on gender issues prior to deployment.

Public Diplomacy
  1. Taking into account the strong influence of the media on the perception of the role of women in society, in culture, in the military and in public life, NATO and its partners are committed to include Women, Peace and Security in their respective public diplomacy strategies and efforts with the purpose of raising awareness among a broad audience, including decision makers, and of reinforcing NATO’s and its partners’ messages.

Implementation – Monitoring and Reporting

  1. This Policy will be supported by an Action Plan.  Such a plan will be result-oriented and will be subject to regular qualitative assessments on the implementation of the Policy. It may be supported by Implementation Plan(s) developed by the International Staff, the International Military Staff, the Strategic Commands, or other entities as appropriate.
  2. An internal task force with representatives from the International Staff, International Military Staff, the Strategic Commands and headed by the Secretary General’s Special Representative for Women, Peace and Security, will oversee the work carried out by NATO.  EAPC and partners aligning with this Policy will be briefed on progress made every six months or at the request of nations.
  3. The Secretary General of NATO will provide a public annual report, under his/her own authority, on the implementation of this Policy.
  4. Objectives and efforts promoting the integration of a gender perspective and priorities on Women, Peace and Security in human resource management and public diplomacy will form an integral part of the overall strategies and plans for these areas.
  5. National Action Plans and other strategic national initiatives will support Nations’ contributions to the implementation of the UNSCRs on Women, Peace and Security.  Nations are encouraged to report progress and to share best practice.
  6. This Policy will be reviewed as needed, and as a minimum every fourth year.


  1. Afghanistan, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Finland, Georgia, Ireland, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, Malta, The Republic of Moldova, Montenegro, New Zealand, Russia, Serbia, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia*.
  2. Read more about the programme at: http://www.nato.int/cps/en/natolive/78209.htm
  3. In accordance with the Comprehensive Approach Action Plan (C-M(2008)0029-COR1; PO(2010)0143‑FINAL, 12 November 2010) as well as the relevant decisions, including those taken at the Lisbon Summit.
  1. Turkey recognises the Republic of Macedonia with its constitutional name.