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Secretary General: the world changes and NATO evolves
23 Sep. 2016

Secretary General: the world changes and NATO evolves

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg outlined the Alliance’s history of adaptation to new security challenges in a keynote speech at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University on Friday (23 September 2016). Addressing students and faculty, he stressed that NATO is essential for security on both sides of the Atlantic, and today’s Alliance must focus both on collective defence and projecting stability beyond its borders.

NATO Review

    • Cyber resilience: protecting NATO’s nervous system 12 Aug. 2016 Without the right information, at the right time, in the right place, the ability of NATO commanders to take a decision is compromised. Information technology provides the glue for command and control capability.
    • On Deterrence 05 Aug. 2016 Deterrence is back. After the end of the Cold War, the Alliance focused less on territorial defence and more on out-of-area crisis management, first in the western Balkans and later also in Afghanistan. That changed in 2014 because of concerns about Russia’s aggressive actions towards Ukraine as well as the rise of so-called Islamic State (or Daesh) in Syria and Iraq.
    • Nuclear deterrence and the Alliance in the 21st century 17 Jun. 2016 Deterrence is back: Major and regional powers are modernising their nuclear forces and giving them a central role in their broader strategic posture. NATO needs to re-establish a robust and credible defence and deterrent.
    • Cyber defence 08 Jun. 2016 Cyber attacks can affect most areas of our lives and are increasing in speed, sophistication and diversity. Should NATO do more to contribute to cyber defence?
    • NATO: changing gear on cyber defence 08 Jun. 2016 The public-private character of how the Internet is governed highlights the need to work together – a key issue when reviewing NATO’s role. Cooperation between like-minded states and international organisations remains the best way to address many cyber risks.
    • Securing the Nordic-Baltic region 17 Mar. 2016 How are NATO Allies and partners, Finland and Sweden, working together to defend this strategically important region in the current security context?
    • Odessa: Ukraine’s secret weapon? 18 Jan. 2016 Odessa has been attacked. Many times. But it has found a way to make the attacks bring people together. NATO Review travelled to the southern Ukrainian region to find out the secret of its success.
    • Don’t forget the Black Sea 20 Nov. 2015 NATO Review goes on patrol with Ukraine’s Black Sea border guards, who have themselves been victims of terror attacks at sea.
    • Why patrolling the Black Sea just got more dangerous 19 Nov. 2015 When Russia annexed Crimea, it affected the whole of the Black Sea region. NATO Review went out on patrol with Ukraine’s border guards to see how they have adapted and hear about how they have already suffered fatalities.
    • Sanctions after Crimea: Have they worked? 13 Jul. 2015 There is no military solution to the Ukraine problem’ is a phrase that has been repeated numerous times since the conflict began. But could there be an economic solution? In our latest piece, NATO’s Defence economist looks at how effective Western sanctions have been in hurting Russia’s economy – and how the countries who imposed them have fared. And some of the results are surprising.
    • Could ISIL go nuclear? 26 May. 2015 As ISIL’s in-house journalist warns that there is an ‘infinitely’ greater chance of the group making a nuclear attack on the West, Wolfgang Rudischhauser looks at how much of this claim is bluff – and how much should be taken seriously.
    • Deterrence: what it can (and cannot) do 20 Apr. 2015 Deterrence is designed to influence behaviour. But it has its limitations. Michael Ruehle illustrates how deterrence has never been a silver bullet – but also how maybe the West needs to relearn some of its nuances.
    • Blood brothers? 30 Mar. 2015 There's a Baltic state that is preparing for future Russian aggression. A state which suffered similar threats and attacks as those seen in Ukraine today. That was 25 years ago when the country tried to leave the Soviet Union. Today it sits in NATO and the EU. NATO Review takes an in depth look at why Lithuania knows Russia - and the Ukrainian situation - so well.

Event Calendar

NATO IN FOCUS

Collective defence - Article 5

The principle of collective defence is at the very heart of NATO’s founding treaty. It remains a unique and enduring principle that binds its members together, committing them to protect each other and setting a spirit of solidarity within the Alliance.

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Collective defence - Article 5
NATO’s capabilities

NATO constantly reviews and transforms its policies, capabilities and structures to ensure that it can continue to address current and future challenges to the freedom and security of its members. Presently, Allied forces are required to carry out a wide range of missions across several continents; the Alliance needs to ensure that its armed forces remain modern, deployable, and capable of sustained operations.

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NATO’s capabilities
Partnerships: building security through cooperation

Many of the challenges NATO faces require cooperation with other stakeholders in the international community. Over the past 25 years, the Alliance has developed a network of regional partnership frameworks with 41 partner countries from the Euro-Atlantic area, the Mediterranean and the Gulf region, as well as individual relationships with other partners across the globe. NATO pursues dialogue and practical cooperation with these nations on a wide range of political and security-related issues. NATO’s partnerships are beneficial to all involved and contribute to improved security for the broader international community.

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Partnerships: building security through cooperation
Operations and missions: past and present

NATO is an active and leading contributor to peace and security on the international stage. It promotes democratic values and is committed to the peaceful resolution of disputes. However, if diplomatic efforts fail, it has the military capacity needed to undertake crisis-management operations, alone or in cooperation with other countries and international organisations.

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Operations and missions: past and present