NATO - North Atlantic Treaty Organization

  • Liaison Mission Moscow, NATO Military
    NATO Military Liaison Mission Moscow The Military Liaison Mission Moscow was established as a self-reliant part of NATO's International Military Staff in Moscow in late May 2002. It enjoys diplomatic privileges under the umbrella of the Belgian Embassy. The Mission supports the expansion of the NATO-Russia dialogue by conducting liaison between NATO's Military Committee in Brussels and the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation. What is its authority, tasks and responsibilities? The Mission’s mandate is to support NATO-Russia dialogue and cooperation by: liaising with the Russian Ministry of Defence on issues covered by the NATO-Russia Council Programmes and in the NRC Military Cooperation Work-Plans; assisting the NATO Information Office in Moscow to explain Alliance policy to the Russian public and other audiences; and helping to facilitate the implementation of all NRC decisions, as appropriate. Who participates? At present the Mission is composed of 13 staff members, including one civilian. It is headed by Rear Admiral Geir Osen of Norway . How does it work in practice? The Mission’s main point of contact is the Directorate of International Treaties in the Russian Ministry of Defence. In addition, the Mission maintains regular contacts with the Ministry’s Directorate for International Relations for VIP visits, the Main Operational Directorate of the Russian General Staff for interoperability programmes and the Russian Main Navy Staff for naval activities. The Mission liaises on issues covered by the NATO-Russia Council Programmes and in the NRC Military Cooperation Work-Plans. These include: Fight against Terrorism Crisis Management Non-Proliferation Arms Control & Confidence Building Measures Theatre Missile Defence Search & Rescue at Sea Mil-to-Mil Cooperation and Defence Reform Civil Emergency Planning Cooperative Airspace Initiative New Threats and Challenges Contact details: NATO’s Military Liaison Mission (MLM) in Moscow Mytnaya Street 3, 119049 Moscow, Russian Federation tel.:+7 495 775 0272 fax: +7 495 775 0280 e-mail: mlm-mailbox@mlm-moscow.nato.int
  • Liaison Office of NATO in Ukraine
    NATO Liaison Office (NLO) Ukraine Overview Mission Facilitate practical cooperation under the NATO-Ukraine Commission; Enhance cooperation between NATO and Ukrainian authorities Tasks Liaise: Ukrainian, NATO, Allied, and Partner Authorities Advise: Ukraine and NATO on current and future cooperation Facilitate: Programmes, Projects, Events, Visits Principle Ukrainian Partners Core Executive: the Cabinet of Ministers, the National Security and Defence Council, the Presidential Secretariat Ministry of Foreign Affairs the Verkhovna Rada (Parliament) Ministry of Defence / Armed Forces Security Sector Institutions: the Security Service, the Foreign Intelligence Service, the Ministry of the Interior, the Ministry of Emergencies, the State Border Guard Service Other Ministries: Economy, Industrial Policy, Finance Civil society organizations involved in defence and security issues. Current Priorities Strengthening Ukraine ’s implementation of broad Euro-Atlantic reforms: Assisting Ukraine in planning and implementing the Annual National Programmes (ANPs) Improving inter-agency coordination Enhancing NATO-Ukraine political and practical dialogue Intensive engagement at a senior political level Intensified dialogue on reforms Consultation on national security and regional security issues NATO-Ukraine Joint Working Groups: Defence Reform / Technical Cooperation / Economic Security Supporting transformation and democratic governance of defence and security sector: Parliamentary and executive oversight; Implementing the National Security Strategy; improving national security system Strengthening democratic management: expert engagement and training civil servants (the JWGDR Professional Development Programme) Strengthening impact of civil society on national security and defence issues (the NATO-Ukraine Partnership Network for Civil Society Expertise Development) Supporting operations and building interoperability to face common challenges: KFOR, the Operation Active Endeavor, ISAF, NTM Iraq Effective, interoperable commands & staffs at strategic/operational levels Deployable, interoperable, sustainable capabilities at operational/unit level New security threats, including fight against terrorism and cyber defence Addressing legacy issues: Munitions Destruction, Safety & Security (the NATO PfP Demilitarization Trust Fund Project) Social Protection of Current & Departing Servicemen (the NATO-Ukraine Resettlement Programme) General Founded in April 1999; co-located with the General Staff Euro-Atlantic Integration Directorate Staff of 16: Civilian Head (Poland/NATO HQ); 1 NATO civilian (Estonia); 3 NATO military (Lithuania, Poland, Germany); 4 Ukr civilian + 3 project teams (currently 7 staff) Close co-operation with the NATO Information and Documentation Centre in Kyiv.
  • Libya and NATO
    NATO and Libya Following the Qadhafi regime’s targeting of civilians in February 2011, NATO answered the United Nations’ (UN) call to the international community to protect the Libyan people. In March 2011, a coalition of NATO Allies and partners began enforcing an arms embargo, maintaining a no-fly zone and protecting civilians and civilian populated areas from attack or the threat of attack in Libya under Operation Unified Protector (OUP). OUP successfully concluded on 31 October 2011. Precursor to Operation Unified Protector In February 2011, a peaceful protest in Benghazi in eastern Libya against the 42-year rule of Colonel Muammar Qadhafi met with violent repression, claiming the lives of dozens of protestors in a few days. As demonstrations spread beyond Benghazi, the number of victims grew. In response, the United Nations Security Council (UNSCR) adopted Resolution 1970 on 26 February 2011, which expressed “grave concern” over the situation in Libya and imposed an arms embargo on the country. Following the adoption of Resolution 1970 and with growing international concern over the Libyan crisis, NATO stepped up its surveillance operations in the Mediterranean on 8 March 2011. The Alliance deployed Airborne Warning and Control Systems (AWACS) aircraft to the area to provide round-the-clock observation. These “eyes-in-the-sky” gave NATO detailed information about movements in Libyan airspace. Two days later the Alliance moved ships from current NATO assets, as well as ships made available by NATO nations for the mission, to the Mediterranean Sea to boost the monitoring effort. After the situation in Libya further deteriorated, the UN Security Council adopted Resolution 1973 on 17 March 2011. The resolution condemned the “gross and systematic violation of human rights, including arbitrary detentions, enforced disappearances, torture and summary executions.” It also introduced active measures, including a no-fly zone, and authorized member states, acting as appropriate through regional organizations, to use “all necessary measures” to protect Libyan civilians and civilian populated areas. With the adoption of UNSCR 1973, several UN member states took immediate military action to protect civilians under Operation Odyssey Dawn. This operation, which was not under the command and control of NATO, was conducted by a multinational coalition led by the United States. Operation Unified Protector Responding to the United Nations’ call On 22 March 2011, NATO responded to the UN’s call to prevent the supply of “arms and related materials” to Libya by agreeing to launch an operation to enforce the arms embargo against the country. The next day, NATO ships operating in the Mediterranean began cutting off the flow of weapons and mercenaries to Libya by sea. NATO maritime assets stopped and searched any vessel they suspected of carrying arms, related materials or mercenaries to or from Libya. In support of UNSCR 1973, NATO then agreed to enforce the UN-mandated no-fly zone over Libya on 24 March 2011.The resolution banned all flights into Libyan airspace to protect civilian-populated areas from air attacks, with the exception of flights used for humanitarian and aid purposes. The Alliance took sole command and control of the international military effort for Libya on 31 March 2011. NATO air and sea assets began to take military actions to protect civilians and civilian populated areas. Throughout the crisis, the Alliance consulted closely with the UN, the League of Arab States and other international partners. Commitment to protecting the Libyan people The Alliance’s decision to undertake military action was based on three clear principles: a sound legal basis, strong regional support and a demonstrable need. By the end of March 2011, OUP had three distinct components: Enforcing an arms embargo in the Mediterranean Sea to prevent the transfer of arms, related materials and mercenaries to Libya Enforcing a no-fly zone to prevent aircrafts from bombing civilian targets Conducting air and naval strikes against military forces involved in attacks or threatening to attack Libyan civilians and civilian populated areas During a meeting in Berlin on 14 April 2011, foreign ministers from NATO Allies and non-NATO partners agreed to continue OUP until all attacks on civilians and civilian populated areas ended, the Qadhafi regime withdrew all military and para-military forces to bases, and the regime permitted immediate, full, safe and unhindered access to humanitarian aid for the Libyan people. On 8 June 2011, NATO defence ministers met in Brussels and agreed to keep pressure on the Qadhafi regime for as long as it took to end the crisis, reaffirming the goals laid out by the foreign ministers. Following the liberation of Tripoli on 22 August by opposition forces, the Secretary General reaffirmed both NATO’s commitment to protect the Libyan people and its desire that the Libyan people decide their future in freedom and in peace. International heads of state and government further reiterated this commitment during a “Friends of Libya” meeting in Paris on 1 September. On 16 September, the UN Security Council adopted Resolution 2009, which unanimously reasserted NATO’s mandate to protect civilians in Libya. The new resolution also established a United Nations Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL). Ending the mission As NATO air strikes helped to gradually degrade the Qadhafi regime’s ability to target civilians, NATO defence ministers met in Brussels on 6 October and discussed the prospects of ending OUP. Ministers confirmed their commitment to protect the people of Libya for as long as threats persisted, but to end the mission as soon as conditions permitted. The NATO Secretary General also pledged to coordinate the termination of operations with the UN and the new Libyan authorities. A day after opposition forces captured the last Qadhafi regime stronghold of Sirte and the death of Colonel Qadhafi on 20 October 2011, the North Atlantic Council took the preliminary decision to end OUP at the end of the month. During that transition period, NATO continued to monitor the situation and retained the capacity to respond to threats to civilians, if needed. A week later, the North Atlantic Council confirmed the decision to end OUP. On 31 October 2011 at midnight Libyan time, a NATO AWACS concluded the last sortie; 222 days after the operation began. The next day, NATO maritime assets left Libyan waters for their home ports. Although NATO’s operational role regarding Libya is finished, the Alliance stands ready to assist Libya in areas where it could provide added value, such as in the area of defence and security sector reforms, if requested to do so by the new Libyan authorities. Command structure of Operation Unified Protector NATO’s North Atlantic Council (NAC) in Brussels, Belgium exercised overall political direction of OUP, while Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE) in Mons, Belgium, carried out NAC decisions with military implementations through Joint Force Command (JFC) Naples. Lieutenant General Charles Bouchard was the overall operational commander of the Combined Joint Task Force Unified Protector. Under his leadership, NATO Maritime Command Naples directed naval operations in support of OUP. Although NATO’s Air Command Headquarters for Southern Europe, in Izmir, Turkey (AC Izmir) managed air operations, the air campaign itself was conducted from NATO’s Combined Air Operations Centre Poggio Renatico in Italy. For this reason, major elements of AC Izmir were moved during the course of the OUP. Italian Vice Admiral Rinaldo Veri from NATO Maritime Command Naples led the maritime arms embargo, while Rear Admiral Filippo Maria Foffi served as the Task Force Commander at sea. No troops under NATO command were on the ground in Libya at any point during OUP. Evolution February 2011 Peaceful protests in Benghazi meet with violent repression by the Qadhafi regime. 26 February 2011 The UN Security Council adopts Resolution 1970, which imposes an arms embargo on Libya. 8 March 2011 NATO deploys AWACS aircraft to the region. 10 March 2011 NATO moves ships to the Mediterranean Sea to boost the monitoring effort. 17 March 2011 The UN Security Council adopts Resolution 1973, which imposes a no-fly zone over Libya and authorizes member states “to take all necessary measures” to protect civilians and civilian-populated areas under attack or threat of attack. 19 March 2011 Several UN member states take immediate military action to protect Libyan civilians. 22 March 2011 NATO decides to enforce the UN-mandated arms embargo. 23 March 2011 NATO vessels in the Mediterranean begin cutting off the flow of weapons and mercenaries to Libya by sea. 24 March 2011 NATO takes the decision to enforce the UN-mandated no-fly zone over Libya in support of UNSCR 1973. 31 March 2011 NATO takes sole command of the international military effort regarding Libya. NATO air and sea assets begin taking military actions to protect civilians in Libya. 14 April 2011 NATO foreign ministers and partners agree to use all necessary resources to carry out the UN mandate. 8 June 2011 NATO defence ministers and partners decide to continue Operation Unified Protector for as long as it takes to end the crisis in Libya. 22 August 2011 The NATO Secretary General reaffirms NATO’s commitment to protect the Libyan people and its desire that the Libyan people decide their future in freedom and in peace. 1 September At a “Friends of Libya” meeting in Paris, international heads of state and government reiterate their commitment to protecting civilians in Libya. 16 September 2011 The UN Security Council adopts Resolution 2009, which unanimously reaffirms NATO’s mandate to protect Libyan civilians. 6 October NATO defence ministers reaffirm their commitment to protect the people of Libya for as long as threats to civilians persist. They also decide to end the mission as soon as conditions permit. 21 October 2011 The North Atlantic Council takes the preliminary decision to end operations at the end of the month. 28 October 2011 The North Atlantic Council confirms the decision to end OUP at the end of the month. 31 October 2011 At midnight Libyan time, a NATO AWACS concludes the last sortie over Libya. The next day, NATO maritime assets leave Libyan waters for their home ports Fact and figures During the course of OUP, all Allies participated in the mission, either directly or indirectly, through NATO’s command structures and common funding. A number of partner nations supported the operation, including Sweden, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, Jordan and Morocco. In total, NATO and partner air assets had flown more than 26,000 sorties, an average of 120 sorties per day. Forty-two per cent of the sorties were strike sorties, which damaged or destroyed approximately 6,000 military targets. At its peak, OUP involved more than 8,000 servicemen and women, 21 NATO ships in the Mediterranean and more than 250 aircrafts of all types. By the end of the operation, NATO had conducted over 3,000 hailings at sea and almost 300 boardings for inspection, with 11 vessels denied transit to their next port of call. In support of humanitarian assistance provided by the UN and nongovernmental organizations, among others, to proceed unhindered, NATO also de-conflicted nearly 4,000 air, sea and ground movements.
  • Libya and NATO : Operation Unified Protector
    NATO and Libya - Operation Unified Protector Information on Operation Unified Protector can be found on: http://www.nato.int/cps/en/natolive/71679.htm.htm
  • Logistics
    Last updated: 06-Jun-2012 11:25 News
  • Logistics Committee
    Logistics Committee The Logistics Committee (LC) is the senior advisory body on logistics in NATO. Its overall mandate is two-fold: to address consumer logistics matters with a view to enhancing the performance, efficiency, sustainability and combat effectiveness of Alliance forces; and to exercise, on behalf of the North Atlantic Council, an overarching coordinating authority across the whole spectrum of logistics functions within NATO. It carries out its work through subordinate bodies: the Logistics Committee Executive Group, the Movement and Transportation Group, and the Petroleum Committee. The LC reports jointly to both the Military Committee and the North Atlantic Council, reflecting the dependence of logistics on both civil and military factors. Role and responsibilities The LC is responsible for harmonizing and coordinating the development of policy recommendations and coordinated advice on civil and military logistic matters, Alliance logistic interoperability, and cooperation in logistics. Developing concepts As new Alliance concepts, visions and technologies emerge, the LC ensures that the necessary logistic support concepts are in place and in line with the NATO vision for logistics. A key document is “NATO Principles and Policies for Logistics” (MC 319/2), which establishes the principle of “collective responsibility” for logistic support between national and NATO authorities. It is based on the idea that both NATO and participating countries are responsible for the logistic support of NATO’s multinational operations and is characterized by close coordination and cooperation between national and NATO authorities during logistics planning and execution. Membership The LC is a joint civil/ military body where all member countries are represented. Membership is drawn from senior national civil and military representatives of ministries of defence or equivalent bodies with responsibility for consumer aspects of logistics in member countries. Representatives of the Strategic Commands, the NATO Maintenance and Supply Agency, the NATO Standardization Agency, the Committee of the Chiefs of Military Medical Services in NATO and other sectors of the NATO Headquarters Staff also participate in the work of the LC. Working mechanisms Meetings The LC meets under the chairmanship of the NATO Secretary General twice a year, in joint civil and military sessions. It has two permanent co-chairmen: the Assistant Secretary General of the division responsible for defence policy and planning issues and the Deputy Chairman of the Military Committee. Support staff and subordinate bodies The LC is supported jointly by dedicated staff in the International Secretariat (IS) and the International Military Staff (IMS). It carries out its work through six subordinate bodies, of which the first two play the principal role: the Logistics Committee Executive Group; the Movement and Transportation Group; the Standing Group of Partner Logistic Experts; the Logistic Information Management Group; the Petroleum committee; and the Ammunition transport safety group. The Logistics Committee Executive Group This is the principal subordinate body, which advises the LC on general logistic matters. It monitors and coordinates the implementation of logistic policies, programmes and initiatives through consultation among countries, the strategic commanders and other NATO logistic and logistic-related bodies. It also provides a forum for addressing logistic concerns and coordinates with the Movement and Transportation Group and other subordinate bodies, and harmonizes their work with the LC’s overall policies and programmes. Furthermore, the Logistics Committee Executive Group develops logistic policies, programmes and initiatives for the LC’s consideration. It meets twice a year in the same format as the LC and is co-chaired by a civil co-chairman, the Head, IS Logistics, and by a military co-chairman, the Deputy Assistant Director, IMS Logistics, Armaments and Resources Division. The Movement and Transportation Group As its name indicates, this group is specialized in the area of movement and transport. It advises the LC on movement and transportation matters and monitors and coordinates the implementation of related policies, programmes and initiatives through consultation and cooperation among countries, the strategic commanders and other NATO transportation and transportation-related groups and agencies. It is co-chaired by the same people who co-chair the Logistics Committee Executive Group - the Head, IS Logistics, and the Deputy Assistant Director, IMS Logistics, Armaments and Resources Division – and also meets twice a year, in March and September in the same format as the LC. In addition, the three Transport Planning Boards and Committees of the Civil Emergency Planning Committee are represented on the Movement and Transportation Group. Both the Logistics Committee Executive Group and the Movement and Transportation Group can form ad hoc working groups to carry out specific tasks that require a certain expertise. The Standing Group of Partner Logistic Experts This group identifies, develops and promotes the employment of Partner logistic forces and capabilities volunteered by Partners for NATO-led operations. It does this under the guidance of the Logistics Committee Executive Group with Partners and the Movement and Transportation Group with Partners. It also makes recommendations concerning logistics pre-arrangements to the strategic commanders and, more generally, provides a forum for addressing logistic topics related to the Partnership for Peace (PfP) programme that any member or PfP country may want to raise. This group meets twice a year under the chairmanship of a Partner country; the chair is assumed for a two-year term. Membership comprises the strategic commanders and senior staff officers from NATO and Partner countries, the IS, the IMS, and the NATO Maintenance and Supply Agency (NAMSA). The Logistic Information Management Group This is NATO’s overarching logistics information management body. It reviews, assesses and recommends NATO logistic information management requirements and develops logistic information management policy and guidance for consideration by the Logistics Committee Executive Group. The Logistic Information Management Group is chaired by a country representative and comprises experts from NATO and Partner countries. It meets as often as necessary. The Petroleum Committee This Committee is the senior advisory body in NATO for logistic support to Alliance forces on all matters concerning petroleum, including the NATO Pipeline System (NPS), other petroleum installations and handling equipment. The Petroleum Committee deals with questions related to NATO petroleum requirements and how they are met in times of peace, crisis and conflict, including expeditionary operations. The Ammunition Transport Safety Group This group provides guidance for NATO forces on procedures for planning, organising and conducting the logistic transportation of munitions and explosives and dangerous goods using the different modes of transportations available. Working with other committees The LC works in close cooperation with the Civil Emergency Planning Committee (CEPC). The CEPC is responsible for coordinating the use of civil resources to support the Alliance’s overall defence effort. The responsibilities of these two committees are interrelated, bringing them and their related sub-committees to work closely together. The LC also works with the NATO Maintenance and Supply Agency, NATO Standardization Agency and the Committee of the Chiefs of Military Medical Services in NATO. Evolution Logistic conferences were, for a long time, a feature of planning within NATO’s military command structure. In 1964, the ACE Logistics Coordination Centre (LCC) was formed to meet the requirements of Allied Command Europe. This centre had detailed emergency and wartime roles, which were rehearsed and tested during exercises. The Atlantic Command (SACLANT) also had a Logistics Coordination Board. However, as Alliance preparedness including logistics readiness and sustainability became a priority, there was an increased need for cooperation and coordination in consumer logistics. What was then called the Senior NATO Logisticians’ Conference (SNLC) was therefore established in 1979 and has since developed and introduced logistic support concepts to meet the logistic challenges of the future. It was renamed the Logistics Committee in June 2010 after a thorough review of NATO committees aimed at introducing more flexibility and efficiency into working procedures.