Transcript - Press Conference

15 August 2002, 11.30 Hours
Coalition Press Information Center
Tito Barracks
Agency Spokesperson Topic
a. OHR Oleg Milisic
  • High Representatives amendments to the RS Law on Urban Planning.
  • Appointment of Ambassador Fassier.
b. OSCE Henning Philipp
  • Recent decision to award ballot paper printing job to Hungarian company.
c. UNMIBH Kirsten Haupt
  • Prosecution of Trafficking Cases.
  • Withdrawal of provisional authorisation.
d. IOM Jennifer Brown
  • Launch of information campaign against trafficking.
e. SFOR Major Scott Lundy
  • SFOR pursuing information received concerning Radovan Karadzic's support network.

Oleg Milisic - OHR

Good morning everybody. It is good to see so many of you here, and so many cameras. The Office of the High Representative has two points for you today.

First, regarding the High Representative's amendments to the Republika Srpska Law on Urban Planning. There seems to be some confusion regarding the reporting of this decision. The amendments to the law will ensure that monuments listed under Annex 8 will be exempted from the licensing regime envisaged in the Law on Urban Planning, thus speeding up the implementation of Annex 8.

These changes basically harmonise Entity legislation necessary for the proper protection, conservation, presentation and rehabilitation of designated National Monuments in Bosnia and Herzegovina. This does not mean that the technical requirements for construction are in any way loosened or, in fact, removed. It is not now possible to construct without permission. In all cases permission to reconstruct is still required. The High Representative's decision relates to firms undertaking this reconstruction which, as before, still have to comply with the respective articles of the Republika Srpska Law on Urban Development, which ensure that the company is professional and responsible and has a court registration. What has changed, i.e., what is now not necessary, is for that company to get a secondary -- additional -- administrative license from the Republika Srpska Ministry for Urban planning, for that company to work in the Republika Srpska.

Put simply, the requirement for presentation of architectural, engineering and other designs, which must be approved, remains. What is now not required is a secondary, as I said, administrative license for the firm undertaking the work this matches the requirements in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina for firms undertaking work on the rehabilitation of designated National Monuments. This is a decision that the High Representative has made to ensure the necessary building permits for these monuments, listed under Annex 8, are issued in a timely manner.

My second point for you today is that the High Representative, Paddy Ashdown, has appointed Ambassador Bernard Fassier as Senior Deputy High Representative and Head of Rule of Law Unit.

Mr. Fassier is a graduate of the Saint-Cyr Military Academy and Senior War College. He remained in the military service until 1986. During his military career, he held the post of Deputy Military Attaché in Moscow and thereafter as the Head of Operations and Training Department of the French Military Government in West Berlin. Ambassador Bernard Fassier has a degree from the National Institute for Eastern Languages in Russian language and from the Institute for Political Science in Paris in International Relations.
At the end of his military career, Ambassador Fassier was seconded into the service of the Quai d'Orsay. His most recent appointment was as the French Ambassador to Belarus

Ambassador Fassier will be heading the 'Rule of Law' pillar where he will be responsible the restructuring of the Bosnia and Herzegovina judicial system. He will be co-ordinating the various agencies tasked with the judicial reform, including the High Independent Judicial Commission, High Judicial and Prosecutorial Councils, and leading other legislative reforms such as the Criminal Code and Criminal procedure Code.

We will be issuing a press release with these details later on today. Thanks very much. That is all I have for you.


Henning Philipp - OSCE

Good morning everybody.

As has been recently reported, the acting head of the OSCE mission, Ambassador Dieter Woltmann, had a very friendly and constructive meeting a few days ago with the head of the Bosnia and Herzegovina Trade Unions Association, Mr. Edhem Biber, and the President of the Graphic Workers Union, Mr. Amer Tosic. The participants of the meeting discussed the recent decision of Election Commission of Bosnia and Herzegovina to award a Hungarian company with the job of ballot printing, but also discussed the competitiveness and the current social and economic situation of the Bosnia and Herzegovina printing industry.

Ambassador Woltmann emphasised that the Election Commission's decision was not at all based on any disqualifying evaluation of the competitiveness of the local printing companies. He explained that the contract awarded by the Election Commission did not only imply printing, but focused on the sorting of the ballots and their distribution to all the polling stations in the country and to over 58,000 individual voters abroad. Due to extremely short timelines, this specialised job required -- particularly in its part, which was not related to printing -- absolute reliability based on previous experience. Insofar, the foreign competitor provided the best guarantees.

The Acting Head of the OSCE Mission underlined, however, that the Bosnia and Herzegovina printing industry is competitive and deserves full support of the International Community and local authorities.

The OSCE Mission has, for a long time, been aware that the printing industry of Bosnia and Herzegovina offers a high quality of work. The mission has used the services of local companies to a large extent since it was established in December 1995. It has never had any reason for dissatisfaction with the jobs done. On the contrary, the work has always been of the highest quality. The financial volume of the OSCE jobs awarded to local printing companies only since 1999 amounts to 1.75 million KM.

For example, Bosnia and Herzegovina printing houses have, by order of OSCE, produced (copies of) the Annual Reports on the State of Human Rights, the Annual Reports of the Ombudsman, a Dictionary of Criminology and Criminal Justice, the decision of the Bosnia and Herzegovina Constitutional Court and the Human Rights Chamber, the OSCE Youth Campaign Art Book, anti corruption brochures, and many posters and leaflets about Property Law Implementation and various other areas, which OSCE is working on.

Just to show you some examples, here is the dictionary which I mentioned, in the three local languages, as well as in German and English (holds it up). This is the guide for demobilised soldiers (holds it up). The Annual Calendar of the OSCE (holds it up). the OSCE Art Book, which was produced in the course of our Youth Campaign (holds it up). And this is an example of all the posters we have had printed by local companies (holds it up).

The OSCE Mission to Bosnia and Herzegovina continues to have full confidence in the competitiveness of the printing industry of Bosnia and Herzegovina and has decided in future to award local companies with all of its printing jobs.


Kirsten Haupt - UNMIBH

Good morning, I have two items for you today. The first one is some comments on the role of judiciary in the fight against human trafficking.

The Mission of UNMIBH has stressed on many occasions that it takes the issue of human trafficking very seriously. In order to tackle this problem in Bosnia and Herzegovina, as you know, UNMIBH has created the Special Trafficking Operations Programme or for short, STOP. The STOP team train specialised local police units on methods to combat trafficking of women and girls.

For the fight against human trafficking to be effective, vigorous police action has to be complemented by decisive and efficient legal action. Successful prosecutions for trafficking have increased in the first six months of 2002 with eight successful cases, doubling the figure for the entire year of 2001. Since June this year we have seen a further increase with 10 cases where traffickers were successfully tried and sentenced.

However, UNMIBH remains concerned over the continuing high level of judicial ineffectiveness in dealing with cases of human trafficking. As an example, six days ago, on 9 August 2002, the Lopare District Court found three individuals guilty of having trafficked two Moldavian women and one Romanian woman and they were only sentenced to suspended prison sentences of one to one-and-a-half years. This mild sentencing is appalling and has to be considered an insult to the women who had become victims of serious human rights violations. Such inconsequential sentencing is belittling all efforts of the police and other institutions in their fight against the hideous crime of human trafficking.

On another issue, the IPTF Commissioner Sven Frederiksen has again withdrawn the provisional authorisation from another police officer: Mr. Zoran Ikonic, an inspector for fire protection in Bjeljina. Following a comprehensive review on his wartime activities, IPTF has found that Mr. Ikonic is unfit to serve within the police forces in Bosnia-Herzegovina.

Mr. Zoran Ikonic served as a police officer in Ilijas Police Station from May to September 1992. He has been identified as having taken part in the arrest and transportation of civilians from Gornja Bioca to detention centres in the area of Iljias. He has additionally been identified as having killed on Bosnian civilian in connection with these events.
This decision of withdrawal of provisional authorisation precludes Mr. Ikonic from employment in any law enforcement agency in Bosnia-Herzegovina now or in the future.

Just for your information, on the statistics we have now surpassed the number of 200 cases, where the provisional authorisation has been withdrawn from police officers. Of those, more then 50 withdrawals have taken place on the grounds of war-time backgrounds.

Jennifer Brown - IOM

Good morning. I have one item from IOM and a short video as well.

IOM has launched a 90-day Information Campaign Against Trafficking in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The campaign is aimed at both foreign nationals who have been trafficked to Bosnia and Herzegovina and Bosnia and Herzegovina nationals at risk of being trafficked abroad.

The campaign is being funded by the United States' Government through their embassy in Bosnia and Herzegovina and is being carried out in co-operation with project partner La Strada, a local Non-Governmental Organisation (NGO).

The Information Campaign Against Trafficking aims to increase awareness among Bosnia and Herzegovina nationals at risk of being trafficked, and to inform trafficked girls and young women about services available to them and how to access those services through hot-lines, local police, and the IPTF. It also aims to inform those who come into contact with trafficking victims, including the IPTF, State Border Service, police, health care workers, bar owners and potential clients about the dangers of trafficking and existing services available to trafficking victims.

The campaign slogan is, Think About it - You Can Decide Only Once. Print, radio, and television ads feature the number of La Strada and IOM's 24-hour hot-line, which refers trafficking victims to existing services.

IOM has initially focused the campaign on Brcko District, where the majority of trafficking victims first enter Bosnia and Herzegovina. However, the campaign has also been extended nation-wide, with TV and radio spots airing daily in both the Federation and the Republika Srpska. Campaign advertisements will also appear in newspapers in Brcko, Bijelina, Banja Luka and Sarajevo.

This campaign will be implemented in two phases. Phase Two of the campaign will see the distribution of 100,000 leaflets, 7,000 posters, 5,000 badges, and 5,000 coasters in four languages, to be distributed throughout Bosnia and Herzegovina, and through IOM's offices in Romania, Moldova and the Ukraine. For increased recognition across national borders, the look and colours of the campaign are in keeping with all other anti-trafficking campaigns launched by IOM in other countries.

This particular project builds on IOM's extensive experience in delivering comprehensive services to trafficked women in Bosnia and Herzegovina. IOM has played a leading role in organising information and awareness campaigns against trafficking world-wide. Within this region, IOM has organised information campaigns in Romania, Moldova, Ukraine, Macedonia, Hungary, and the Czech Republic. These information campaigns have used a variety of media and have focused on both potential victims of trafficking and broader public awareness. I have 10-second and a 30-second video clips that I will show you now (video clips are shown). There is more information available on IOM's counter trafficking programme available on the tables outside.

Major Scott Lundy - SFOR

Dobar dan from SFOR.

Today, SFOR soldiers from Multinational Division Southeast, supported by soldiers from Multinational Division North, are continuing their ground and helicopter patrols throughout southern Republika Srpska. The aim of these patrols is unchanged from yesterday: SFOR is pursuing information it has received concerning Radovan Karadzic's support network.

By support network, I mean the circle of people who shelter, feed, alert, guard and move Karadzic in an effort to keep him from justice. The network also includes the locations, routes and methods of transportation Karadzic uses to remain at large.

Early yesterday morning, SFOR troops departed from bases in the Foca region and moved south into the Celebici area. At the same time, other SFOR soldiers deployed into the areas of Visegrad and Trebinje. These movements were accomplished quickly, professionally and without incident. By moving in the early hours, SFOR minimised its impact on civilians and local traffic.

SFOR troops moved swiftly to their assigned areas of responsibility and began the tasks they were given. Traffic control points, also known as checkpoints, were established to monitor people and vehicles moving in and out of SFOR's areas of interest. Drivers in the regions experienced minor delays in some cases, but access to Celebici and other locations where SFOR set up checkpoints was never completely restricted.

To date, all operations have been conducted without incident, and every effort has been made to minimise their impact on the local population. SFOR has questioned several individuals and searched several locations, but no one has been detained or brought to an SFOR camp for further questioning. In the event SFOR detains someone, a detailed update will be provided to the media.

SFOR is very pleased with the progress of this operation thus far.

SFOR will not limit its operation to specific towns and villages. It will move its forces from some of the locations it was seen operating in yesterday and relocate in other areas of interest as it accomplishes certain aspects of its mission. As many of you can attest, SFOR is a highly mobile force, capable of shifting its soldiers from one location to another quickly using helicopters and armoured vehicles.

SFOR is grateful for the co-operation of the local police and government of the Republika Srpska in this operation. The local population has also been co-operative, allowing SFOR soldiers to focus on their missions without interference.

This operation is part of SFOR's continued efforts to confirm existing information and gain new facts that will eventually lead to the detention of Radovan Karadzic and other persons indicted for war crimes. Bringing persons indicted for war crimes to justice is critical to move Bosnia and Herzegovina further toward a peaceful and prosperous future.

I will be available throughout the day to answer any additional questions you might have concerning this operation.


Oleg Milisic - OHR
I can see there are already questions.


Questions and Answers


Q: Amra Hadziosmanovic - AFP
Scott, you said you searched several locations yesterday. Are these locations where you suspect Karadzic could have used for hiding?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
These are locations that are linked to his support network. They maybe hideouts. They may be the locations of people who are assisting him in some way or another. What we are trying to do, as I said for most of yesterday, is confirm the existing information we have and also gain some additional details that will help us in our attempt to bring him (Karadzic) to justice. The further point I would make is that this operation would not have been possible had we not gained as much information as we have in the last five months, following our raids or actions in Celebici at the end of February and 1 March. Based on all of that information, we are now conducting these additional ground and helicopter patrols.

Q: Amra Hadziosmanovic - AFP
What about these locations, you said it could be…

Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
I am not going to go into…

Amra Hadziosmanovic - AFP
Do you know that for sure, or do you not know, or you do not want to tell us?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
That is why we are out there; to confirm the information we have. Not all of it is going to be accurate. We recognise that and the only way to confirm whether something is true or not is to either physically check it out or to check it out from the air, using helicopters.

Q: Amra Hadziosmanovic - AFP
You also said that you are pleased with the progress. What are you pleased with?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
We have continued to move down our checklist of areas of interest and at this point, we are quite content that we have essentially confirmed certain information and other information that we recognise as being false. In this way, we are getting a truer picture. It is clearer, it is a little bit broader, than the picture we had before.

Q: Merdijana Dervisbegovic - ABC
Scott, if you do find Karadzic supporters what can you do with them, can you arrest them? Is that in your mandate?


A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
We would have to establish their identity and also confirm that these people are the folks we have in our packages of information that we are working from. It is hypothetical right now, but if someone who is known to be in his support network were to stumble into us, or we were to come across him the course of our duties, we would certainly want to question that person and a detention might follow.

Q: Merdijana Dervisbegovic - ABC
Why did you announce this operation in advance? Usually you do not do that.

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
Our intention is to try and reduce some of the concern that the public has. This area is very sensitive to any sort of an operation of this scale. We wanted to be straight right off the bat and clarify what it was we were looking for.

Q: Merdijana Dervisbegovic - ABC
Did you not in a way notify the accomplices that you were coming, so you gave them enough time to run away and to hide?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
I do not think so. No, I would disagree. We have been open about this in order to reduce the level of concern that the local population has. The people who are in his network know who they are. They know we are actively working toward confirming their identities, establishing their patterns, et cetera. So, they have known we have never stopped working on bringing PIFWC's or Persons Indicted For War Crimes to justice. We do that part of every day.

Q: Nedim Dervisbegovic - Reuters
Scott, did the inspection of the Karadzic family house in Pale help you?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
I could not say. I simply do not know.

Q: Nedim Dervisbegovic - Reuters
Because you said the Celebici raid did help you?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
Certainly, we are gathering information as it relates to Persons Indicted For War Crimes all the time. But any specific information from that (inspection of the Karadzic family house), I would not know.

Q: Nedim Dervisbegovic - Reuters
What about the support network? Are these people ordinary civilians? Are they officials? And the locations you inspected yesterday -- are they private facilities, houses or whatever or are they institutions? Could you give us more details about this?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
I think I have given you as much of a description as I can. The identities of these people, their positions within their community, I would not care to comment on. I think at this time, we have an operation on-going and we would not want to compromise that in any way.

Q: Nicholas Hawton - BBC
Scott, can you put this raid into some sort of context? There have been many raids in the past across Bosnia for Karadzic's support network or people who are linked to him. How significant is this raid, in terms of numbers that you are deploying and in terms of numbers of helicopters? Is this a really important raid? Are you getting really close to Karadzic now, or is this just another attempt that will fail?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
We are doing a large-scale operation in this area; you have all been reading the newspapers along with myself. There are certainly quite a number of soldiers from the Multinational Division Southeast, as well as soldiers from Multinational Division North involved. We have helicopters providing aerial reconnaissance. We also have a number of armoured vehicles rolling about setting up checkpoints and also conducting patrols. It is an extensive operation. We will be content to confirm the information we have and gain additional information. We are confident that the information will eventually lead to the detention of Radovan Karadzic and other Persons Indicted For War Crimes.

Q: Nicholas Hawton - BBC
For instance, is this the biggest raid in last twelve months Karadzic-related?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
This is not a raid. Let's be clear. This is an operation, it is a large-scale operation, and I will leave it to you to determine whether it is the largest we have done in the last twelve months or not. You will not always see us doing operations and we do work on this all the time. This is the largest one that has been publicly seen since our operations in Celebici at the end of February and 1 March.

Q: Nicholas Hawton - BBC
Just one question for the UN and the Office of the High Representative. The United States Ambassador is meeting the Presidency today I understand, to discuss the situation with the International Criminal Court? What would you like to come out of that meeting?

A: Oleg Milisic - OHR
I think any comment the Office of the High Representative could give will not have changed since we spoke last Tuesday. Which was that it is not for the Office of the High Representative to comment. You will have to speak to the respective parties in this case -- the Bosnia and Herzegovina authorities and the United States Ambassador.

Q: Nicholas Hawton - BBC
But Paddy Ashdown is also the European Union Representative here, isn't he?

A: Oleg Milisic - OHR
That is correct. But, as I understand it, this is an issue of a bilateral agreement between the two Sovereign States. So, you will have to seek comment from them.


A: Kirsten Haupt - UNMIBH
I would support the last statement Oleg made. In particular, the bilateral agreement and the matter of the two states; we will have to see what out come will there be of such meetings.

Q: Nicholas Hawton - BBC
So, the UN has no view about bilateral agreements which could undermine international treaties?

A: Kirsten Haupt - UNMIBH
I have already said this is a very comprehensive legal issue that is way beyond the scope of what we are dealing with here. Our mission deals with the restructuring of the Police Force and the International Criminal Court has nothing to do with that. If you want to have an official UN standpoint on the issue, please call New York.

Q: Antonio Prlenda - Oslobodenje
Scott, did your troops conduct any interrogations of people yesterday?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
As I said in the statement, we did stop some vehicles and search them and we did speak with the locals. Certainly, there are photographs in today's newspaper that would reflect that. In terms of interrogation, certainly not. SFOR does not interrogate anyone. We will question people but only when we have reason to believe they have information important to our mission here. There have been reports of a postman who was detained and removed, but those are completely false. As I have said, we have detained no one at this time.

Q: Antonio Prlenda - Oslobodenje
What can we expect? How long will this operation continue? When will it end?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
The operation is continuing now, and I would expect it will run for another day or so. And certainly, as we draw to the close of the operation, I will be speaking with you and distributing a comprehensive press release. That will be your signal, if you have not already called me, that the operation has drawn to a close.

Q: Antonio Prlenda - Oslobodenje
As I understand, the end of the operation will depend on the list or the information that you have and want to check on the ground?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
We need to be satisfied that we have achieved all that we set out to do. As I said, we are at this point pleased with the progress of the operation. Clearly, we will not stop until we have confirmed all of the information we went out to confirm.

Q: Antonio Prlenda - Oslobodenje
A last point. How important was the American reward program?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
The United States' State Department or the Embassy here can talk about the Reward for Justice Program. SFOR has, in the past, distributed leaflets and posters that advertise the Reward for Justice Program offers a 5 million US $ reward for information leading to Radovan Karadzic's or Ratko Mladic's detention. For more information you should speak with the United States Embassy.

Q: Antonio Prlenda - Oslobodenje
Can you tell me for this particular operation, how important was it to SFOR?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
Our soldiers do not qualify for this reward program. The Rewards for Justice Program is for the citizens of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Q: Nedim Dervisbegovic - Reuters
Did you get any tips from the program? Did anybody call Rewards for Justice and give some information to the United States' State Department that you may be using?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
That is an excellent question, Nedim. You would have to speak with the United States' Embassy. We are not linked to the Reward for Justice Program except that we distribute their materials.

Q: Nedim Dervisbegovic - Reuters
If Rewards for Justice gets any information about Radovan Karadzic, what happens next?

A: Major Scott Lundy SFOR
Nedim, I am not suggesting that they will not share that information with us.

Q: Nedim Dervisbegovic - Reuters
Information on this particular operation?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
Certainly, the United States shares information concerning Persons Indicted for War Crimes with SFOR, as do all the member countries. In that respect, they are no different in terms of the relationship. But in terms of your question, 'Has the specific information from the Rewards for Justice Program helped us in any way', you would have to speak with the United States' Embassy. We are pleased with the relationship we have the United States and the other members in terms of sharing information.

Q: Nedim Dervisbegovic - Reuters
Excuse me. How would they know if it helped you or not? They probably just give information, then it is up to you to see if it is helpful.

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
You can ask them what they have provided.

Q: Nedim Dervisbegovic - Reuters
Do they give you feedback about information; do they give you information then you tell them if the information was helpful because we found this guy?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
There is a relationship between the United States' troops on the ground here in SFOR and SFOR's command structure in terms of getting the information from the United States to SFOR in order to conduct operations. Yes it happens, but I can not pinpoint that information for you. I will certainly ask the question after the press conference. I expect it is all blended into our analysis. I do not think we can probably pull it out at this point and say it came from Rewards for Justice.

Q: Amra Hadziosmanovic - AFP
Scott, I still do not understand something about this story. Yesterday, you engaged large numbers of troops, helicopters and APCs to pursue information you have on Karadzic's network. At the same time, there is Karadzic's wife working with the Red Cross in Pale. You had coffee with her. And also there is the Bajagic guy who you visited a couple of months ago and gave him a letter for Karadzic. Do you really believe that these two people have no idea about Karadzic's support network?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
We continue to use all of the available methods to gain information regarding Persons Indicted For War Crimes. The letters that were distributed, they have helped in some respects. Other times, we have not received the assistance that we hoped for. We have to try all the methods at our disposal in order to successfully complete the detention of all these Persons Indicted for War Crimes. It is a difficult, drawn-out operation. SFOR is committed to doing its part and, yes, we will continue using all available means to gain information.

Q: Amra Hadziosmanovic - AFP
That includes detentions?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
If we find someone who is clearly linked we will certainly question them and if it is conclusively determined that they are involved in this in a way that is very serious, they maybe detained. A detention is unlikely in this case. Again, we are looking for information. We are confirming some old stuff we have and trying to gain new information or facts, and that is the purpose of this operation.

Q: Amra Hadziosmanovic - AFP
You know very well that these two people Bajagic -- I do not remember his first name -- and obviously Karadzic's wife do have information?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
We are going to do everything within our power to try and engage them for information: meet with them, send letters, speak to other people who know them. We will continue to work that avenue. But, it cannot be the only avenue and in this case, the operation you have seen in the last 24 hours is another part of what we do here. I would call on Mr. Karadzic and other Persons Indicted For War Crimes to give themselves in. They know that they will properly treated, that they will go to The Hague and that they will ultimately have their day in court. Do the right thing give yourself in. If they are not going to do that, then we would ask that the Government Officials and the people that are in a position to influence these Persons Indicted For War Crimes do something. If they will not do it, then SFOR will. And SFOR has been very clear from the outset: we will do it if no one else will.

Q: Aleksandar Dragicevic - AP
Scott, according to your intelligence is Karadzic in Bosnia?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
I am not in a position to provide you with that information; that is considered to be an operational detail. However, SFOR does know generally the movements of Radovan Karadzic.

Q: Senad Pandzic - BHTV 1
Scott, what is the reaction from the local authorities? Do you have their support? Are they co-operative or are they obstructing your investigation?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
With regard to the local authorities, we have brought them into the picture and told them what we are doing so there can be no confusion as to the sudden presence of SFOR in a particular location. In that respect, we have told them that you can expect see large numbers of SFOR soldiers on the ground and helicopters in the air. That is so that they do not panic or react in away that might cause everyone a lot of harm. That was the purpose, and in that respect, there is an understanding that we are out there doing a mission. We have asked that they not stand in the way of it. Certainly, for the local police, we have asked that they provide the same good law and order that they have been providing all along and they continue to do that while we are in the area. So, that is the kind of co-operation I am speaking of.

Q: Antonio Prlenda - Oslobodenje
Did Headquarters SFOR request any additional technical assets from NATO for this particular operation, assets that are not usually used by SFOR?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
We have been able to conduct this operation using our regular sources of support.
All of our high-end technology, it is no different from when we do other operations.

Q: Nedim Dervisbegovic - Reuters
Carla del Ponte has made no secret that she wants to see Karadzic in The Hague in October for the start of a trial. Is it safe to assume you are stepping up your efforts to make it happen? You have just said, 'If no one else is willing to do it, you will have to do it'. So, I guess there is two months left for the trial?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
The time and place of our operations is a decision that the Commander of SFOR makes. Certainly, we recognise that there are certain goals in mind and it is no secret that Lord George Robertson the Secretary General for NATO has echoed Carla del Ponte in saying that he would also like to see Mr. Karadzic in The Hague as soon as possible. So, we are working toward that end.

Q: Nedim Dervisbegovic - Reuters
Do you think, you have a really tight deadline and you do not meet it, it could be quite embarrassing for both SFOR and NATO and the UN as well?

A: Major Scott Lundy - SFOR
We are continuing to operate in this area on this issue, as we have done all along. In terms of timelines, it would be excellent to bring him in today If not today, perhaps tomorrow. That is the approach we are taking. In the long-term, SFOR will successfully detain Radovan Karadzic. Certainly, for Mr. Karadzic, the noose is closing.

Oleg Milisic - OHR
Okay. Thank you all very much.